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Juarez Hawkins


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Sculpture, Painting, Mixed Media... 20 Followers Member since 2006
United States

Biography

Juarez Hawkins, a native of Chicago, is a second-generation artist. Her mother, Florence Hawkins, is one of the painters of Chicago’s famous Wall of Respect. Juarez received her B.A. from Northwestern University, and her M.A. from Columbia College. A member of the Sapphire and Crystals collective, Juarez is a two-time recipient of both the Community Arts Assistance Program (CAAP) Grant and the Oppenheimer Teacher Incentive Grant.
Juarez has exhibited widely, hosting solo exhibitions at Concordia University, the 33 Collective Gallery, and the South Side Community Art Center. Her work has been featured in the WGCI Calendar of African American Art, and has been showcased in such literary works as The Bull-Jean Stories, Tales of a Woojiehead, and the anthology Mother Tongues.
Juarez has taught art at a variety of venues, including Gallery 37, Little Black Pearl Workshop, and a number of Chicago-area schools. She currently teaches at Chicago State University.

Juarez Hawkins, a native of Chicago, is a second-generation artist. Her mother, Florence Hawkins, is one of the painters of Chicago’s famous Wall of Respect. Juarez received her B.A. from Northwestern University, and her M.A. from Columbia College. A member of the Sapphire and Crystals collective, Juarez is a two-time recipient of both the Community Arts Assistance Program (CAAP) Grant and the Oppenheimer Teacher Incentive Grant.
Juarez has exhibited widely, hosting solo exhibitions at Concordia University, the 33 Collective Gallery, and the South Side Community Art Center. Her work has been featured in the WGCI Calendar of African American Art, and has been showcased in such literary works as The Bull-Jean Stories, Tales of a Woojiehead, and the anthology Mother Tongues.
Juarez has taught art at a variety of venues, including Gallery 37, Little Black Pearl Workshop, and a number of Chicago-area schools. She currently teaches at Chicago State University. Read less

Hawkins Juarez

Resume/CV


JUAREZ HAWKINS
8746 S. Luella, Chicago, IL 60617
(312) 209-8661




Employment
Lecturer, Chicago State University
January 2006-Present
Teach and develop curricula for undergraduate courses, including field studies and guest speakers. Courses include Intro to Visual Arts, Drawing, Ceramics, 3D Design, African American Art, Art for K-8 Teachers, and Senior Portfolio. Provide exhibition, scholarship, and competition opportunities for students. Instructor for Grow Your Own (GYO) career development program. Provide graphic design services for President’s Gallery and student exhibitions.

Teaching Artist, Chicago and suburbs
August 2001-December 2005
Developed and taught arts integration workshops for Chicago-area public schools, grades Pre-K through 12. Created collaborative, inquiry-based lesson plans that combined fine arts and academic instruction. Awarded Oppenheimer Teacher Incentive Grant in 2002 and 2005. Served as Co-lead Artist for Art in the Prairie program, Nathan Manilow Sculpture Park, Governors State University. Provided professional development programs in arts integration for teachers.

Art Coordinator, Little Black Pearl Workshop
June 1999-June 2000
Responsible for teaching art and entrepreneurship workshops for youth ages 10–18. Developed new products and teaching tools. Participated in sales, promotion, and community events. Developed Adobe Illustrator workshop for teachers at Schurz High School.

Education
Columbia College, MA, Interdisciplinary Arts, 2001
Northwestern University, BA, Computer Studies, Concentration in Art, 1985

Software
Adobe Creative Suite, Microsoft Office

Related Experience
Featured artist, Creative Connections, cable program co-sponsored by the Field 
 and DuSable Museums, 2008
Featured artist, CAN-TV cable show, From Heart to Hand, 2007
Juried Portraits by Women & Members’ Show, Woman Made Gallery, 1998, 2006

Selected Solo Exhibitions
AlterEgo, South Side Community Art Center, Chicago, 2008
Tribe, Ferguson Gallery, Concordia University Chicago, 2008
Tribe, 33 Collective Gallery, Chicago, 2006

Selected Group Exhibitions
Front and Center, Hyde Park Art Center, 2014
Diasporal Rhythms: A 10-Year Love Affair with Collecting Art of the African Diaspora,
Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Chicago, 2013 (Catalog)
From the Earth, Woman Made Gallery, 2013
Sapphire & Crystals, Christopher Gallery, Prairie State College, 2013
Sapphire & Crystals: State of (G)Race, Woman Made Gallery, 2012
Ordinary Dissonance, Addison Center for the Arts, 2012
Sapphire & Crystals: Friendships, South Side Community Art Center, 2010
Not Just Another Pretty Face, Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago, 2008, 2010, 2013
Sapphire & Crystals: Routes to Roots, Nicole Gallery, Chicago, 2009
Cultural Memory: Transdiasporic Art Practices, Woman Made Gallery, 2009
Women Imaging Women: A Study of Female Portraiture, Robert Morris University, Chicago, 2009
Transitions, Seabury-Western Seminary, Evanston, IL, 2008
Black Creativity, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, 2007-8, 2012
Creative Convergence, Center on Halsted, Chicago, 2007
Re-Assignments, juried by Joyce Owens, A.R.C. Gallery, Chicago, 2007
Faculty Exhibition, President’s Gallery, Chicago State University, 2006, 2008
Dirty Fingernails Say a Lot, Foundry Arts Centre, St. Charles, MO, 2006
33 Collective Gallery, Chicago:
The Transferred Image: Printmaking Exhibition, 2006
Self-Portrait Exhibition, 2006
The Open Door Gallery, Chicago:
Collective Exhibition, 2005
Let Us Introduce Ourselves, 2005
Warm Images for Cold Times, 4th Presbyterian Church, Chicago 2005
Sapphire & Crystals: In Black and White, Concordia University Chicago, 2004
Woman Made Gallery, Chicago:
Women of the African Diaspora, juried by Kymberly Pinder, Woman Made Gallery, 2005
Autobiographies, Woman Made Gallery, 2002
Portraits, Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 2003
Juried Art Competition, Lubeznik Center for the Arts, Michigan City, IN, 2002-3
The Visible Soul, The School of the Art Institute, Gallery 2, Chicago, 2001
Invitational Exhibition, Aurora Public Art Commission, Aurora, IL, 1998
William J. Bachman Gallery, Munster, IN, 1997
Sapphire & Crystals: The Way My Mama Did, BAGIT Gallery, Chicago, 1994

Related Experience
Lead Teaching Artist, 20 Neighborhoods Program, Woman Made Gallery, 2012
Featured artist, Creative Connections, cable program co-sponsored by the Field and DuSable Museums, 2008
Featured artist, CAN-TV cable show, From Heart to Hand, 2007
Juried Portraits by Women & Members’ Show, Woman Made Gallery, 1998, 2006
Featured artist, WGCI Calendar of African-American Art, 1995, 2000

Awards
Third Place and Best in Ceramics Awards, Black Creativity Exhibition, juried by Naomi Beckwith, 2012
Diasporal Rhythms Collectors’ Invitational Award, 2010-11
Awarded Ragdale residency, 3Arts, 2009
Best in Show, Self-Portrait Exhibition, 33 Collective Gallery, 2006
Oppenheimer Family Foundation Teaching Incentive Grant, 2002, 2005


A Little History


When I finished Northwestern, I looked for ways to support myself as an artist. While holding down a data processing job, I started a small business out of my home to launch a line of holiday cards I’d designed. Warm Brown Greetings was a modest success; I sold the cards in stores and through a network of sellers. I started taking art and graphic design courses part-time, initially with an eye toward creating a better greeting card. I disbanded my little company three years later, but continued my classes and illustration work. Publications that feature my work include Mother Tongues, The Bull-Jean Stories, Tales of a Woojiehead, The Literary Xpress, and the WGCI Calendars of African American Art.

Over the next three summers, I began participating in local art fairs, primarily as a sketch artist. I enjoyed working live in public, but disliked being subject to the caprices of nature. My first gallery show in 1990 got me out of the elements. It also gave me a chance to flex some digital muscle. I created an animation my work, which I installed on a kiosk amidst the paintings on display. A number of my subsequent exhibitions have had a performance and/or digital component.

In 1991, I left data processing to work as a freelance graphic artist. I also continued to exhibit regularly, averaging several group shows a year. Affiliations with Woman Made Gallery and the Sapphire and Crystals collective helped advance my career. These groups exposed me to a wide array of creative women, resources and ideas, while helping me grow as an exhibiting artist.

By 1998, I’d tired of life in front of a computer. I’d been teaching between freelance gigs (City Colleges, Gallery 37, Little Black Pearl Workshop), and looked to expand my credentials. I enrolled in Columbia College’s Interdisciplinary Arts Graduate Program. My thesis work was a performance piece that combined original music (mine) and sculptural “garments” that addressed the nature of adornment.

After graduation, I taught art at the elementary and secondary levels, establishing residencies in various schools around the city. Working with Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education, I specialized in arts integration, using art to enhance and reinforce academic lesson plans. I was awarded two Oppenheimer Teacher Incentive Grant Awards for my integrated curricula. Meanwhile, I developed performance work for Columbia’s Glass Layers Festival and performed around the city as a singer with the Drum Divas, a local drum ensemble.

I currently teach at Chicago State University, where my course offerings include drawing, ceramics, art appreciation, and African-American Art. I continue to exhibit - check my Agenda page for notice of upcoming events.


Art Speaks: Community Building and Cultural Memory


I was one of two featured speakers for this event. My talk focused on the ways the African American communities keep the arts alive in their neighborhoods.

Art has traditionally been viewed as an individual representation of beauty and aesthetics, but how does art extend beyond this definition by acting as a vehicle for community expression? For both the Ukrainian and African American communities in Chicago, art has been utilized as a valuable tool for re-imagining social history and projecting their own voices. This event links the rise of recent artistic practices to the development of cultural identity and imagination. Discover how DuSable Museum of African American History and the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art have been providing artists spaces to share stories while strengthening the bonds of their respective communities.

LISTEN TO THE WBEZ PODCAST: Click on the "Links" page to hear my lecture. I'm the second speaker, about an hour into the podcast.


Teaching Philosophy


I believe creativity can flourish in a safe, supportive environment. Toward this end, I create learning spaces where students are encouraged to move past any sense of limitation to create quality work they can be proud of. Often, the non-traditional and/or disadvantaged populations I serve have gaps in their education or artistic training. I draw upon my experience as a K-12 educator to coax out engaging work without shaming, while encouraging stronger study habits and artistic skill-building.

As an actively working professional artist, my passion for art as a practice goes beyond the theoretical. I believe students interested in an art career should be provided with the tools to establish themselves in the marketplace. My years of exhibition experience lend a real, direct understanding of the rigors of a professional practice. Moreover, my experiences as a self-employed artist bring to the classroom a real-world understanding of the business of art. I support this by exposing students to other industry professionals, via gallery talks, studio visits and in-class presentations.

I am involved in developing art consumers as well as producers; both should be well-informed about the art they see, and comfortable interpreting and critiquing said art. I believe in the importance of teaching history so students can see how shifts in a society are reflected in its art trends. To facilitate student engagement with art, I present them with modern and contemporary works that touch upon issues central to their own lives. I created Art on Trial, a series of controversial works and related questions designed to foster lively classroom debate. I am particularly interested in the work of minority and non-western artists, and am committed to presenting such art in tandem with mainstream work. I continue to actively research this area, utilizing both academic resources as well as the rich history embedded in Chicago's artistic communities, to present an array of art as diverse as the people who create it.

In order to produce technologically proficient students, technology-based tools must be part of the classroom and curriculum. I provide access to web-based study tools (such as the QUIZZART flash card files I developed), and integrate popular digital media (blogs, YouTube, social media) into my course offerings. Course management tools (such as Mediafire and ConnectArt) streamline the administrative part of my job and provide a vehicle for sharing assignments and other materials with students.

I hope to foster a community of lifelong learners who continue to critically engage with art, who see art not as something stuffy and detached from their reality, but as a vital part of the world in which they live.