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Joyce Owens


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Painting, Sculpture, Mixed Media... 128 Followers Member since 2005
United States

Biography

Joyce Owens is a painter and sculptor who creates free standing sculptural works and masks/constructions. Her two degrees are an (MFA) degree from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut and BFA, from Howard University in Wash., D.C. At Yale her main influences were Lester Johnson and Bernard Chaet. Others who guided her at Yale were Willie Ruff, musician, artists William Bailey and Al Held. While at Howard University she studied with preeminent African American artists and scholars including David Driskell, the late internationally known Lois Mailou Jones, sculptor Ed Love who was Owens’ mentor until his premature death, historian and painter Dr. James Porter and printmaker and painter, James L. Wells. California artist Leo Robinson was an important guide during undergraduate years as was Lloyd McNeill.

I am known as a figurative artist deciding the most important work I can do is to address issues around race and gender. I wish racial issues had been resolved by now and we und... Read More

Joyce Owens is a painter and sculptor who creates free standing sculptural works and masks/constructions. Her two degrees are an (MFA) degree from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut and BFA, from Howard University in Wash., D.C. At Yale her main influences were Lester Johnson and Bernard Chaet. Others who guided her at Yale were Willie Ruff, musician, artists William Bailey and Al Held. While at Howard University she studied with preeminent African American artists and scholars including David Driskell, the late internationally known Lois Mailou Jones, sculptor Ed Love who was Owens’ mentor until his premature death, historian and painter Dr. James Porter and printmaker and painter, James L. Wells. California artist Leo Robinson was an important guide during undergraduate years as was Lloyd McNeill.

I am known as a figurative artist deciding the most important work I can do is to address issues around race and gender. I wish racial issues had been resolved by now and we understood that we are all humans, but until it goes away and I am alive I will look to educate people how the ignorance that perpetuates these ideas.

Owens recently left her position as curator and associate professor of painting and drawing at Chicago State University to pursue a full-time art career. Owens has been sought out to jury fine art exhibitions and art fairs including the DuSable Museum of African American History, Woman Made Gallery, Old Town and Wells Street art fairs, Black Creativity at the Museum of Science and Industry, Women's Caucus for Art, The New East Side Art Fair to name a few. She has been a curator for many successful shows and an arts facilitator/consultant putting together artists with events. Owens is a knowledgeable arts panelist who has also developed discussion topics for galleries at Columbia College in Chicago, The Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, The School of the Art Institute, The Carver Museum in Austin, Texas, Nicole Gallery in Chicago (now closed) and the South Side Community Art Center, and more. Owens has taught studio painting and drawing classes at Chicago State University since 1996 while also maintaining an active exhibition career. She has been sitting on the Advisory Committee for the Department of Cultural Affair’s Chicago Artists Month between 2002-2012. She consults with the Chicago Artists Coalition, and is on the Advisory Board of Woman Made Gallery in Chicago. Owens is an associate editor for The Journal of African American History and has had her art and writing published in books and journals.

In college Owens was the art editor for Howard’s literary magazine for several years. She won the Student Council Award in Painting and The Special Talent Grant for three years, paying her tuition. She was also on the Dean’s list. While still an undergraduate McGraw-Hill hired Ms. Owens to illustrate two children's books.

Joyce Owens is originally from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and attended Germantown High school where she excelled in art and was selected to be the editor of her high school year book among her other varied activities. She attended art classes at Philadelphia High School for Girls and Tyler School of Art on Saturdays. During her summers off, Ms. Owens worked as a camp counselor, becoming the Arts and Crafts Director for William Penn Camp when she graduated from Howard. During a summer after graduation she worked in a city of Philadelphia arts program with, now presidential portrait artist, Simmie Knox. Read less

Owens Joyce


By ELIZABETH OWENS-SCHIELE Contributor February 14, 2012 7:50PM

Story Image

"Dream Big," by Joyce Owens

‘Two Plus Two = Jackson, Owens,
Williams and Wheatley’

Oakton Community College, Koehnline Museum of Art, 1600 E. Golf Road, Des Plaines

10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays, through March 23

(847) 635-2633 or www.oakton.edu/museum
Updated: February 17, 2012 9:12AM


Exquisite, cast bronze sculptures by Preston Jackson, bold colors of Joyce Owens’ acrylic figurative paintings, unusual, layered vellum collages of Rhonda Wheatley and an intriguing, large-scale installation of a vehicle by Bernard Williams create an exhibit that educates viewers about African American history.

“Two Plus Two = Jackson, Owens, Williams, and Wheatley,” is a free exhibit celebrating Black History Month through March 23 with the paintings, bronzes and sculptures of four Chicago African American artists at Oakton Community College’s Koehnline Museum of Art in Des Plaines.

“We put together African American artists from the Chicago area who are all very established to celebrate Black History Month,” Harpaz said, “and they are all pretty diverse.”

Owens opens the exhibit in the 1,000-square-foot gallery flooded with natural light with her collection of bright acrylics.

Searching history

“She’s definitely dealing with her heritage and searching the historical context,” Harpaz said. “What’s unique about her technique is that she uses the canvas in a non-conventional way, extending it beyond the frame so it becomes three-dimensional.”

Her signature pieces, the Angel Guardians, depict ancient tribal women in extended canvases that reach out to viewers with not only art, but historical significance.

Owens has always been fascinated with African American history and says she’s always been an artist. Growing up in Philadelphia, Owens had an affinity for images and color, and was encouraged by her creative family of musicians, singers and even her uncle, prolific photographer Jack T. Franklin. A MFA graduate of Yale University, Owens later moved to Chicago, explored television then discovered art education and Chicago State University, where she has been for 15 years, acting as galleries curator and art professor, while creating up to 25 original art pieces annually for commission and exhibitions.

“I like working with acrylics, mixed media assemblage, wood, metals, three-dimensional wall pieces, free standing, clay and print making,” Owens said. “I have experience in a number of mediums but I’m primarily interested in assembling a wide range of materials to make my artwork.”

Those materials include found objects such as the empty wine crates and cigar boxes she transformed into her “Out of the Box” series inspired by a book by W.E.B. DuBois with photographs of middle class African Americans at a 1900 Paris Exhibition, in which DuBois attempted to fight racial stereotyping. “When I came across them in 2003, I was enraged we were still fighting that same battle,” Owens said about race issues in the U.S. “I try to educate people with my art,” she said.

Noting that certain African American attributes were necessary to survive, such as darker skin and curly hair to protect from the sun and flaring nostrils to breathe in the environment, she said, “All these physical attributes can be explained through science and don’t have anything to do with race that we’ve built up.”

Owens created a series of 10 black and white portraits on canvas stretched across found boxes depicting African Americans “who were well dressed with a look of intelligence,” inspiring and defying traditional stereotypes.

Fierce art

For a 2008 exhibition at the DuSable Museum, she created the powerful piece, “The Medieval in America,” which some have described as “fierce” with images of race lynching, Klu Klux Klan members with fiery red eyes in white hoods and even a young black man in handcuffs with a target on his chest.

“I think those people who perpetrated those crimes, they’re monsters,” said Owens, who uses the word monster throughout the boldly colored acrylic piece.

Just steps away, Jackson depicts his own version of African American history in his cast bronzes. Jackson uses painstaking detail in the faces of not only the African Americans depicted in his sculptures, but even in the eyes of the horse in his 2008 cast bronze of “The Escape.” His commentary on the piece explains, “She was a big ole mare, one dat wuz breeded from a Tennessee walker and a hairy hoofed work hos. We knowed we shouldn’t have ran off on her back, but dar wuz no other way – she was de onliest hos big and fas’ enough to carry us norf where we could be free and treated like full-blooded ‘Mericans….”

Jackson, a professor of sculpture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, displays five of his cast bronzes, which celebrate Black History with great detail and even bursts of color embedded into the bronze sculptures.

Words as art

On the other hand, Wheatley’s art focuses on language and the written word, growing out of her background in English and writing.

“Wheatley is interested in the often elusive act of trying to understand and translate one’s feelings into words, and this tension inspires the fluid nature of her pieces,” Harpaz writes in the exhibit catalog.

Her Untitled series of pieces are layered vellum collages on canvas incorporating words of divine and spiritual significance from ancient and indigenous cultures, Harpaz said. She draws the words in cursive, embellishes them, and then layers the cutouts over vibrant collages.

The largest exhibit piece is by Williams, who previously taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and creates public art pieces inspired by history and pop culture. His “Structuring the Auto” is a full-size car framed rather rudimentary, with the only ready-made elements being the car’s four wheels.

“My cars are constructed from plywood, which suggests a moving backward, away from technology,” Williams said. “They are powerless at the moment … this powerless state, in relation to how we understand the auto, deposits these large constructions firmly in an alternative realm.”

Harpaz adds: “He’s fascinated with American culture, uses ready-made materials while investigating American history in a variety of ways including three dimensional.

Creative differences

“Each artist is very different and the exhibition is unique,” Harpaz adds. “They are four, African American artists with different interests and different expressions and different audiences.”

Owens agrees.

“Preston and I have same stream of consciousness on how history plays an important role in our lives,” Owens said. “We each decided that we wanted to be the artists to commit that information and show it in our work to wider audiences. Bernard and Rhonda take a different approach but we’re all on the same page.

“Rhonda is talking more globally, dealing with language, using language as her medium, those shapes in her work are letters in other languages and distorted. Bernard takes more of an international point of view in his work. He will use symbols from different cultures in some of his installations.

“You’re going to see very different artists but there’s something there for every taste,” Owens adds, “and seeing a show like this, it will open people’s eyes to new ways of thinking.”


Chicago Gallery News feature by Kevin Nance


lick on link to read pdf. story
pdfs/NancearticleSept11.pdf


"Our Difficult Sunlight"


Cover artist for text book; About the Artist, page 210, “Our Difficult Sunlight” A Guide to Poetry, Literacy, & Social Justice in Classroom & Community” Georgia A. Popoff & Quraysh Ali Lansana, launched at University of Illinois, Jane Addams Hull House Museum, Feb. 10, 2011


Expos Collective (Listing)


Selected exhibitions and honors:

2006: Pittsburg Center for the Arts; Migrations of the African Diaspora, juried exhibition, May 5- Aug 20

2006: Butridge Gallery, DAC, Austin, Texas; Boundless: Perceptions from Within, group exhibition, Mar 3-30

2006: Woman Made Gallery, Chicago; 9th International Open, Won First Prize, Margaret Hawkins, art critic, juror, Mar

2006: Arc Gallery, Chicago; I Have a Dream, juried exhibition, John Pittman Weber, juror, won Best of Show, Feb- Mar

2006: Neleh Gallery, Mentoring in the Community, presenting student artist, Feb - Mar

2006: Museum of Science and Industry, Black Creativity juried art exhibition, Chicago, Il, Jan-Feb.

2006: Artjaz Gallery, group show, invitational, Philadelphia, Pa., Jan- Mar

2005: Columbia College’s DanceAfrica Chicago’s 15th Anniversary, Chicago Theatre, signature poster artist. Sankofa was presented citywide in print form, on public transportation, on the website, in the press, etc. (Oct)

2005: Sapphire and Crystals: Black White and Blues, Woman Made Gallery, curator. Exhibition selected as featured program for Chicago Artists Month, (Oct. 7 – Nov. 10)


2005: Real Art Works (R.A.W.) Vision at Parkway Ballroom. Featured artist. Image used on press and postcards, etc. and interviewed Paul R. Jones, (Sept. 30, Oct. 1, 2)

2005: Juried exhibition, Kymberly Pinder, PhD, juror, Women of the African Diaspora, Woman Made Gallery, Oct. 7 –Nov 10)

2005: Featured artist, Gallery Guichard, “X” anniversary exhibition of artists in the Daniel T. Parker collection, (Oct 1- Nov 12)

2005, Juried exhibition Two-person exhibition, Homewood Studios Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Trip Tick, (May 29 - June 30)

2005, Howard University Fine Art Gallery, juried exhibition, Eight Decades of Art at Howard University (March - Nov)

2005, Nicole Gallery, Chicago, group exhibition “Consciousness and Conditions IV” (Mar – April)

2005, The Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago, curator and exhibition artist, The Dream Revisited II: The Dream and the World (February)

2005, The Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago, curator and exhibition artist, Hot Images for Cold Times (January)


Art Museum of Greater Lafayette, Indiana 2-person exhibition


“Parallel Narratives”, two-person exhibition at the Art Museum of Greater Lafayette, West Lafayette, Indiana with sculptor Preston Jackson, January 21 to March 19, 2011. Owens presented lectures at the museum Feb. 17, and Purdue University, Jan. 21, and conducted a workshop at the museum on Jan. 22. Director Renee Thomas of the Purdue University African American Cultural Center co-sponsored this very wonderful and well-attended exhibition.


Chicago Women's Caucus for the Arts Award


I was nominated for and awarded the honor for Outstanding Achievement in the Visual Arts. The award was presented at the Chicago Cultural Center during the national Womens' Caucus for Art national meeting and the College Art Association meeting where I sat on a panel.


Critical review Chicago Sun-Times by Art critic Kevin Nance


Great review of my "Out of the Box" series.


"Dreaming Bigger in Strange Times" curator and artist


https://www.facebook.com/womanmadegallery.1992/photos/pb.121967861183071.-2207520000.1512513016./1662975903748918/?type=3&theater


U.S.A. Today article "Amazing Art is Better Than a Museum", includes my commission


The Blackstone Hotel has played a prominent role in Chicago’s storied history since it opened more than a century ago, playing host to presidents, royalty, celebrities and even gangsters.

With an impressive art collection featuring more than 1,600 contemporary works of art, the luxury hotel continues to create a colorful legacy as a cultural destination in itself. In fact, it rivals some of the city’s most prestigious museums.

"The Blackstone has always been supportive of the artist community," says General Manager Kim Corrigan. "Its Beaux-Arts design is a work of art itself, and a dedicated art gallery was built within the original walls of the hotel upon its completion in 1910. Located on the Cultural Mile, it is only natural to bring this artistic spirit and creative culture to life every day for our guests and associates alike."

Committed to spotlighting Chicago and its local artists, the Blackstone Hotel recently commissioned new pieces to specifically represent the hotel, and made art the focus of both its public and private spaces. There is something interesting and beautiful to see everywhere you look, from the paintings in the lobby to the guest room key cards and do not disturb signs.

"What’s really special is that this world-class artwork isn't in a gallery or museum space," said Katherine Sharp of Nine dot Arts, who helped curate the project. "This is truly bringing art to the public, and that’s so important because people aren’t going to galleries the way they once did. The Blackstone is supporting artists in the best way possible: by actually buying their work for the hotel’s permanent collection and putting it on display for everyone to enjoy."

You can take a self-guided tour of the public pieces and relax with a drink at the unique Timothy’s Hutch. You’ll be able to sit and admire works like Painter by Celeste Rapone, which is placed prominently in the lobby to immediately put the importance of the art into focus.

But nothing beats staying at this iconic hotel and taking the elevator one story at a time to explore the different works of art that greet you on each floor.

Here are ten pieces you really need to see in person:

Painter by Celeste Rapone | Lobby

Artist by Celeste Rapone — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Celeste Rapone draws from themes of Dutch Golden Age painting, like portrait and still life. She loves to work with patterns and bold, often garish color palettes.

The artist in Painter doesn’t seem engaged in what they’re doing, which makes you want to know more about them. Rapone’s portraits are often referred to as “pretty” because the composition and color are on point but something is definitely off.

Portraits are expected to be beautiful, and this portrait hanging prominently in the lobby lets you know you’re in for lots of surprises as you explore the Blackstone’s art collection.

Orchid Stack VII by Stephen Eichhorn | Art Hall

Orchid Stack VII by Stephen Eichhorn — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Stephen Eichhorn has taken ikebana and floral arranging to a completely different level with his stunning series of orchid-based hand-cut collages.

They’re gorgeous from a distance, but the closer you get, the more awestruck you’ll be by his fluid, intuitive composition and the patterns, themes and textures he explores with such intricate detail.

The Blackstone Chronicle by Eric Garcia | 6th floor

The Blackstone Chronicle by Eric Garcia — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

You can learn so much about The Blackstone’s history through the graphic art of Eric Garcia.

Imbuing street art style with a historical perspective, he depicts The Blackstone’s reputation as “The Hotel of Presidents,” its place in movies like The Color of Money, its namesake, Timothy Blackstone, and its former owner, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. He doesn't leave out one of the hotel's most colorful guests, Al Capone, who used to hold meetings while getting his hair cut in the hotel’s windowless barbershop.

Neon Classic by Andrew LeMay Cox | 9th floor

Neon Classic by Andrew LeMay Cox — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Known for his renditions of paintings from influential artists throughout history, Andrew LeMay Cox has reinvented an Anthony Van Dyck portrait of Mary Villiers.

Deconstructing the themes of traditional Baroque art to satisfy contemporary standards of beauty, he dramatically changes the color palette and makes us look at the piece in an unexpected way.

Cooler by the Lake by Joyce Owens | 10th floor

Cooler by the Lake by Joyce Owens — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Painter and sculptor Joyce Owens is a figurative artist whose work addresses issues around race and gender.

Her style of portraiture is more narrative, and is very much about sharing a story. Cooler by the Lake features a Chicago landscape in the background and two fictional characters based on Lena Horne and Nat King Cole, both of whom were frequent guests of the hotel and who represent the Blackstone’s jazz history.

Brutalized Gainsborough by Chad Wys | 11th floor

Brutalized Gainsborough by Chad Wys — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Chad Wys’ signature collages juxtapose the old with the new. The woman in this piece may be dressed in period style clothing, but the addition of the brush marks immediately makes it a contemporary work. The big, gold, sculptural frame continues to play on this theme.

Although the hotel tried to get a commissioned piece from Wys, he said he couldn’t make any art in the new political climate. For that reason, Brutalized Gainsborough is one of the few works in the Blackstone that is a poster rather than an original piece of art.

R: 8:54; C: 15:51; L: 14:56 by Michelle Litvin | 12th floor

R 854; C 1551; L 1456 by Michelle Litvin (12th floor) — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Architectural photographer Michelle Litvin spent 24 hours in The Blackstone, documenting the architectural details that are unique to the hotel and to Chicago.

So much of the original building’s architecture was preserved, and in this triptych, Litvin captures a fireplace in a guest suite, a chandelier in the Grand Ballroom and a window in the English Room. The title is the time stamp of each of the three photos.


10BEST

Celebrating female innovators at the Racine Art Museum
Vandal Gummy Bear by WhIsBe | 14th floor

Vandal Gummy by WhIsBe — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Al Capone was sentenced to prison on October 17, 1931, and street artist WhIsBe pays homage to that infamous date with this irreverent piece, which is part of his Vandal Gummy Bear series.

The anonymous artist, whose name is short for What Is Beauty, creates prison mugshots of the sweet and much-loved candy bear holding an identity card to spark discussion and get people to explore their preconceptions.

Chicago Flamingos by Katarzyna Krol | 17th floor

Chicago Flamingos by Katarzyna Krol — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Katarzyna Krol pays homage to Chicago’s legendary architecture with this charcoal and pastel drawing.

Her whimsical illustrations reveal the inspiration behind the 53-foot-tall Alexander Calder stabile which stands proudly on Federal Plaza. Often referred to as simply “the big red statue,” Krol ensures you will never forget its name.

Ideas Filled the Air by Matthew Hoffman | 21st floor

Ideas Filled the Air by Matthew Hoffman — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

A picture may be worth a thousand words but Matthew Hoffman, the artist behind the three million “You Are Beautiful” stickers distributed around the world, uses both to create powerful statements.

This wood piece was commissioned for the hotel, and was inspired by Suite 915 where Republican leaders once met secretly to nominate Warren G. Harding as their party’s presidential candidate. The suite is popularly referred to as "the smoke filled room," thanks to an AP reporter who described the scene of the secret meeting.


http://www.10best.com/interests/hotels-resorts/the-blackstone-hotels-amazing-art-collection-is-better-than-a-museum/


Washington, D.C. review


A Walk Through Sacred and Profound History


By Misty Brown - WI Contributing Writer
Wednesday, 21 January 2009 15:13
“From Slavery to Freedom: A Tribute to Obama” is currently on view at Parish Gallery. This politically aggressive exhibition features the work of Robert Sengstacke, called “one of the most significant photographers of the Civil Rights era,” by the New York Times.
“I never tried out to be the best. Art is a form of religion in itself,” said Sengstacke, considered a trailblazer of cutting-edge photography. This show is accompanied by a video with a compelling soundtrack titled, “Coppin’ The Ghost.” It is a phrase that means you must get the shot.
A native of Chicago, most of Sengstacke’s images are portraits of historical and political figures, including Shirley Chisolm and Sarah Vaughn. He also exhibits familiar family scenes of Northerners and Southerners. The viewer enters a time-capsule of more than 50 years with the 25 black and white images on display.

One striking image spotlights former heavyweight champion Joe Louis with Fidel Castro. On sight are two commanding photographs recording the tumultuous political climate when the New York Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (1945-1971) lost his chairmanship of the powerful Education and Labor Committee where he steered over 50 bills through Congress.

As one of only two Black Congressmen, Powell challenged the informal ban on Black representatives using Capitol facilities reserved for members only. Sengstacke injected the stark reality of his arrival at the Capitol and the frenzied atmosphere during his investigation.

There is an image of Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr. walking with two others in jeans reading the headline of the Chicago Defender that stated, “King Murdered.” In 1905, the newspaper was regarded as America’s largest and most influential Black weekly newspaper by the beginning of World War I.

Also, President Barack Obama is captured in the moment of having fun and dancing at the African Festival held on the grounds around the Du Sable Museum in Chicago.

Visual artist Joyce Owens’s portraits complement Sengstacke’s photography. She created a palette of neutral tones (grey, black and white) on wooden crates. These exquisite portraits of our ancestors offer a rarefied air of splendor and elegance.

The show gives the viewer an opportunity to reflect on history and evokes fond memories of our heroes, idols and forgotten relatives of the Antebellum and Reconstruction era.

The show runs through Jan. 31 at Parish Gallery in Georgetown, Northwest. Visit for gallery hours.


SunTimes Kevin Nance art critic


Critical review about my paintings, "Out of the Box" series at Nicole Gallery.


Dreaming Bigger in Strange Times, curator and exhibiting artist/Nov. 11-Dec.16, 2017


CHICAGO —Woman Made Gallery (WMG) is proud to present ‘Dreaming Bigger in Strange Times,’ opening on Saturday, November 11th through December 16, 2017. The final exhibition during WMG’s 25th Anniversary year, it is the second exhibition at WMG’s new location in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood. Chicago-based artist Joyce Owens is the curator for the exhibition including works by 17 women artists from diverse backgrounds and working in a variety of styles and media.

Featuring women artists currently residing in the Midwest, this invitational exhibition intentionally strives to reflect the independent thoughts, hopes, dreams and fears around the strangely volatile world we find ourselves inhabiting since the last election. The women, working in a wide range of art mediums, represent diverse ethnic and ancestral backgrounds. Many express their political, social, religious and ethnic beliefs through their work. After all, America has welcomed immigrants promising them freedoms they were denied at home from the first meal at Plymouth Rock. Others were not welcomed under equal circumstances, to put it mildly, and others who were here first got the worst surprise as payment for their original kindness. The focal point that speaks to each artist shows up in their work in subtle and/or overt ways that you will see if you look. Their artist statements will provide more insight. Neighborhoods in Chicago (and other cities around the world) are generally homogeneous, despite desegregation. This powerful group of artists will demonstrate that diversity makes us stronger! -Joyce Owens

Exhibiting artists: Joanne Aono; Rose Blouin; Arlene Turner Crawford; Anne Farley Gaines; Abi Gonzales; Patricia Larkin Green; Indira Freitas Johnson; Felicia Grant Preston; Kim Laurel; Nora Moore Lloyd; Joyce Owens; Jane Stevens; Lynn Tsan; Kathy Weaver; Shahar Caren Weaver; Rhonda Wheatley; and Trish Williams.

Curator: Joyce Owens

Ragdale Fellow Joyce Owens is a painter and sculptor with an MFA degree in painting from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut and a BFA from Howard University in Washington, D.C. She was curator and associate professor of painting and drawing at Chicago State University. She has been the curator for numerous exhibitions including: The David and Reva Logan Center at the University of Chicago; The Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago; Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, IL; The Art Center in Highland Park, The Noyes Cultural Center, Evanston, IL; The Southside Community Art Center and others. As an arts panelist she has developed discussion topics for Columbia College Chicago, The Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, The School of the Art Institute, The Carver Museum in Austin, Texas, Nicole Gallery in Chicago; Bradle University in Peoria, IL, and the South Side Community Art Center, and she has been the juror for Black Creativity at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago; The Old Town, Wells Street, and the DuSable Museum art fairs. Owens is associate editor for The Journal of African American History and has had her art and writing published in books and journals. For more information visit: http://www.joyceowens.com

https://womanmade.org/artwork/dreaming-bigger-in-strange-times/


Expos Solo (Listing)


Wood Street Gallery and Sculpture Garden
Lamont Zeno Gallery
Clarence White Gallery
Chicago State University
Woman Made Gallery


Museum of Science and Industry Black Creativity


The 37th annual Black Creativity juried art exhibition just opened in Chicago. I won an Honorable Mention for my 4-part Slavery Survivors piece. I had previously won a First Prize out of 1200 entries with Margaret Hawkins.

The show is terrific with over 500 entries; about 100 art works were accepted. The Museum is free until the end of January so if you are in Chicago, please take a look!


Sunimes/Lincolnwood, IL features Koehnline Museum review


entertainment/10582080-421/oakton-college-art-show-celebrates-black-history-month.html


Boundless exhibition panel


At the Carver Museum in Austin, Texas during panel discussion on the Butridge Gallery exhibition featuring Joyce Owens and other women artists, including Deborah Roberts, Amalia Amaki, Zoe Charlton and Vicki Meek.


5th International WMG, Chicago, Faith Ringgold, juror


First place!
awarded by Faith Ringgold, the 5th International Art Open at Woman Made Gallery, Chicago, Illinois (1500 works submitted by 500 artist entries)


"In Art, triumph and Controversy", Kevin Nance, Chicago Suntimes


In art, triumph and controversy

December 23, 2007
BY KEVIN NANCE Sunday Show Editor

The year 2007 was one of upheaval, reconfiguration and even a modicum of controversy for the visual arts in Chicago.

Within the past 12 months, the City Council passed a revision of the city's Public Art Ordinance, giving the Department of Cultural Affairs greater control over the city's public art program and provoking a rare, spirited but ultimately unsuccessful public protest by artists and their supporters. The year also brought the end of a series of lawsuits against the department by attorney Scott Hodes, who lost in court.

It was a trying year, too, for Chicago art dealer Richard H. Love, who was beset by a series of lawsuits alleging that he failed to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to clients who had given him artworks to sell on consignment.

On a more positive note, 2007 saw the resurgence of Art Chicago, the once-failing art fair successfully resurrected at the Merchandise Mart as part of a larger collection of shows and events known as Artropolis. The Chicago-based Terra Foundation generously funded "American Art American City," a much-needed (and ongoing) initiative drawing attention to the city's American art offerings.

There were also several notable museum exhibits, including group and solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Chicago Cultural Center and the Chicago History Museum, as well as a number of terrific efforts by galleries. Here are the ones I'll remember most, in alphabetical order:

**Zana Briski: "Brothel" at the Stephen Daiter Gallery. The Oscar-winning creator of "Born into Brothels" offered a moody yet surprisingly luminous show of photographs of the Calcutta red-light district.

**Mark di Suvero sculpture in Millennium Park. These giant, oddly accessible metal structures added a touch of quirky, people-friendly modernism to Chicago's signature public art space.

**Judith Geichman: "Soak" at the Alfedena Gallery. Gorgeous, evocative abstract work by an underappreciated Chicago artist.

**Krueck + Sexton: Facade of the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies, 610 S. Michigan. Yes, it's architecture, but this beautiful composition in glass is also high art.

**"New Narratives: Contemporary Art from India" at the Chicago Cultural Center. This fantastic group exhibit showed how Indian artists are engaging with the international art world while maintaining a connection to their national traditions.

**Audrey Niffenegger: "Elegy for Isabella Blow" at Printworks Gallery. In this lovingly macabre tribute to an eccentric British style icon, the author of The Time Traveler's Wife proved once again that she can do far more than write.

**Joyce Owens and Preston Jackson: "Artists Who Teach" at the Nicole Gallery. This painter and sculptor dominated a fine show of Chicago-based African-American artists with images of a real and imagined black history.

**Art Shay in two retrospectives at the Chicago History Museum and the Daiter Gallery. The veteran photojournalist got a fresh look as an artist and Chicago treasure.

**Rudolf Stingel at MCA. The Italian-American artist got a well-deserved retrospective highlighting his parallel, complementary work in photorealism and conceptual art.

**Jeff Wall at the Art Institute. The master Canadian photographer's monumental light-box photographs got the star treatment they deserved in this stunning show.

**Karl Wirsum: "Winsome Works(some)" at the Cultural Center. The Chicago Imagist got a big, satisfying, long-belated retrospective that suggested the darker depths beneath his sunny surfaces and obsessive wordplay.


The Chicago Sun-Times Critical review


This Sept 21, 2007 critical review of the exhibition with Preston Jackson, Barlow and Thomas Lucas was one that really showed that the art critic, Kevin Nance was very sensitive to the images I presented. All four participating artists are strong professionals, so it was very rewarding to be noticed in this group. I have pasted it below.

These teachers can do as artists
September 21, 2007
BY KEVIN NANCE Critic-at-Large
Those who can't do, teach, the old saw goes, and often it's all too true. In the Nicole Gallery's impressive if somewhat overstuffed new show of works by a quartet of African-American artists who are also members of Chicago academic communities, the conventional wisdom gets torn to shreds.
"A Creative Alliance: Artists Who Teach," featuring Joyce Owens, Preston Jackson, Thomas Lucas and Barlow, shows just how well these artists practice what they preach.
» Click to enlarge image
Joyce Owens casts haunting, haunted figures in portraits including “Woman in a White Skirt.”

'A Creative Alliance: Artists Who Teach'
RECOMMENDED
Through Nov. 3
Nicole Gallery, 230 W. Huron
Free
(312) 787-7716
The dominant figures here are Owens and Jackson, long established at Chicago State University and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, respectively. They get pride of place in the gallery's main room, and they command it effortlessly with images that vibrate with a deep connection to black history from the time of slavery to the present. Both depict real and fictional ancestors, drawing on the past to produce contemporary icons.
Of the two, Owens makes a quieter but still emphatic statement. Her largely monochromatic portraits of black men and women, often wearing costumes from the 19th and early 20th centuries, are haunted, haunting projections of a fierce sort of dignity. You feel the strength of these people, and also the way they wore it like armor, protective but burdensome. The weight of history is on their often narrow shoulders, its shadow stealing across their faces.
Striking, too, is Owens' decision to present those compelling faces on what seem to be old wooden boxes, the rough grain of the wood incorporating itself into the image like a second skin. The connection to an old-timey earthiness is powerful and poignant, and gives the portraits an insistent forward thrust from the wall, suggesting an agreement with William Faulkner that the past is not dead; it's not even past.
These faces have an excellent view of Jackson's bronze figurative sculptures nearby, which make their own, rather different claims for attention. Where Owens' two-dimensional portraits hover in a kind of hushed stillness, Jackson's three-dimensional pieces strut their stuff. Tall, proud, muscular black women -- it's no pun to call them statuesque -- stroll in billowing gowns, dancing the juba, calling down spirits and generally making mockery of their technically inanimate states of being.
There are too many pieces for the space -- Jackson's work needs room to breathe -- and I missed the written texts with which he accompanied the pieces in his magnificent "Fresh from Julieanne's Garden" at the Chicago Cultural Center a couple of years ago, giving each one its proper narrative context. Jackson is a storyteller, and without its literary dimension, his project feels incomplete. Still, for viewers unlucky enough to have missed "Julieanne's Garden," this smaller selection is the next best thing.
Peltz at Koscielak GalleryViewing Lorraine Peltz's "Chandeliers, Starbursts, etc.," the Chicago artist's one-woman show at Gosia Koscielak Gallery (1646 N. Bosworth, through Oct. 3), is a little like watching a particularly breezy episode of "Sex and the City" with the sound turned off. You're not sure exactly what's going on in these dreamy, Technicolor paintings, but the big themes are of the post-feminist variety: identity, fantasy and the sheer thrill of being a woman.
Go-go-booted legs, lipsticked lips and other female body parts float between paint-spattered backgrounds and floral (or celestial) foregrounds, along with pairs of fruits in speech bubbles that whisper of the joy of sex, or at least of talking about it. The chandeliers of the title are strangely dark, though, suggesting that not everything shines in the land of love.


Nicole Gallery


Joyce at Nicole Gallery on 230 West Huron in Chicago with her art work behind her. These works reflect the variations within African American skin tone.The photograph was taken by Rose Blouin in 2003


Real Art Work, R.A.W., Chicago


2005:
Selected!
Featured artist, Real Art Work (R.A.W) Chicago, Illinois, work used on all advertising and publicitity in print and on website, poster, etc.


Joyce Owens' portraits represent life's ups and downs


http://www.pjstar.com/article/20130608/News/306089892
By Leslie Renken
Joyce Owens' "Retro-racing Picasso #5," a sculpture made of wood, copper and acrylic, is on display at the Contemporary Art Center of Peoria.

Joyce Owens' creativity can't be confined to a single medium. A talented painter, she adds elements of collage to both her painting and her sculptures, and some of her paintings have very sculptural characteristics.

But even with the diversity of style, there is one word that can be used to describe all her artwork - they're all portraits, images of people. For Owens, it all comes down to human beings.

"Where do the problems come from? Who can solve the problems? It's all about choices, to me anyway," said Owens during a recent interview from her Chicago home. Owens, who has a master of fine art from Yale University, is an art professor and curator at Chicago State University. She has won numerous awards and has shown her work extensively in the U.S. and overseas.

"Joyce Owens: Retrospective" will be at the Contemporary Art Center of Peoria through June 28. The show features mixed media paintings, sculpture, and a series called "More than Skin Deep" which, through the clever use of folds, turns painted canvas into a sculptural experience.

When queried if she wrinkles the canvas before or after painting, Owens laughs. "Everybody asks me that question. Art is supposed to make you think, if that's what people think about, that's OK - I love it."

Owens likes to be challenged by her work, and painting canvases after they've been intricately folded is certainly challenging. But the folds also have connotations which give the work not only literal dimension, but figurative dimension as well.

"The folds represent life - life isn't smooth. If we were a chart it would be up and down, and then down more, and then way down, and then up," she explained. "The paintings are like life - it's not perfect."

The wrinkles also hint at the many dimensions in the human personality.

"All you know about me is what I'm telling you, but there are other layers to me," said Owens. "So the folds on the canvas represent the obstacles that we have to overcome, we have to learn to overcome the bumps."

Many of life's bumps are caused by false assumptions people have about each other.

"In the "More than Skin Deep" series I'm applying it to race. I've done other series where I'm trying to get people to look beyond the surface of human beings," said Owens. "Basically we're all pretty much the same. The range between human beings of different ethnic groups is very minimal. We really are all humans, and we bleed red blood - all of us do."

Owens didn't begin her career thinking she would focus on issues of gender and race, but as an African-American woman, it's a topic she simply couldn't avoid.

"I don't think there was ever a time when I didn't experience something sort of racial," Owens said. In the mid-1960s Owens was chosen to be the art editor on the school yearbook at the predominately white high school she attended in Philadelphia. She submitted artwork for the selection process, and with a name like Joyce Owens, she believes the teacher didn't know until he met her that she was African American. After meeting her he tried to choose a different student for the job, and when Owens' parents stepped in, Joyce volunteered to share the role with the other student - the two girls were friends.

"My feeling was that it was not necessarily because I was black, but because I wasn't Jewish," said Owens with a laugh.

As an adult living in Chicago's predominantly white Lincoln Park, Owens often experiences subtle - and sometimes not-so-subtle - moments of racism. It's only natural for the issue to surface in her work.

"I'm not a racist-sort-of-civil-rights-human-rights person, but I like to, in a very nice kind of way, I want you to think about this stuff," she said.

Owens' work often highlights historical aspects of the African-American experience not commonly known.

"The figures and faces are sometimes portraits from history that I publish in accessible forms for people who are not historians and may not know about African-American history beyond slavery, poverty, and the Civil Rights struggle," said Owens in her artist's statement.

Figures and faces are all woven together in Owens' work as a way to show the interconnectedness of all human beings.

"My hope is that - well, I think that it's stupid that we don't get along," said Owens.

While issues of race are addressed in Owens' work, they are not the only ideas related. For Owens, art is a way of working out problems.

"My work changes as I change," said Owens. "From self-centered toward looking toward the future. When I was pregnant I drew a lot of pregnant people. . . . When my mother died, I drew people underground, sort of coming apart. That was my sadness - artists channel what they cannot see."

While Owens' art often presents ideas that inspire thought, the artist says she works intuitively - she doesn't plan the subject matter out ahead of time.

"With art you don't know exactly what you are going for until you have done it, and then you have to sit down and think about it," she explained. "As much as art school helps you to learn how to mix colors, and about linear perspective . . . you have to use those skills in your own personal way. You have to learn to trust your instincts."

The artist has had years to tune into her intuition and hone her skills. She knew when she was in third grade that she wanted to be an artist, and she came from a family of creative people for which art was a way of life. And while she hasn't always earned her living making art, she's always made art.

"I tell people that I don't need special conditions to make art," said Owens. "I don't need to be in the right mood or have special music. I'm an artist, and I make art. I don't know what made me an artist - I just do it 'cause I can't stop myself."

If you go

- What: "Joyce Owens: Retrospective," artwork by Chicago-based artist Joyce Owens.

- When: Through June 28. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and until 8:30 p.m. on Fridays.

- Where: Contemporary Art Center of Peoria, 305 SW Water St., Peoria.

- For more information visit artcentr@mtco.com, or www.joyceowens.com.

Leslie Renken can be reached at 686-3250 or lrenken@pjstar.com. Follow her on Twitter, @LeslieRenken, and subscribe to her on Facebook.com/leslie.renken.
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Faculty Exhibition


I am here on the right in the black coat with a fellow artist and professor during the President's Gallery reception for the Faculty Exhibition 2006. My first exhibition as the newly appointed curator at Chicago State University, Chicago, Illinois.


Columbia College Chicago, Dance Africa Chicago


2005:
Selected!
Signature artist, DanceAfrica Chicago at Columbia College, Chicago Illinois, work used on posters and advertisement, nationally and citywide, cash prize (Kerry James Marshall was previous signature artist)


Paul Klein feature in Huffington Post


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-klein/diasporal-rhythms_b_4119269.html


Nicole Gallery on Huron Solo show


This image was reproduced in the Chicago Reader.


A Great Day in Bronzeville


Over 150 artists showed up for this historic photo including Dr. Margaret Burroughs, the founder of the DuSable Museum, Anna M. Tyler an artist and historian, her husband Al Tyler, also an artist and Kerry James Marshall, a MacArthur fellow, among other noteable, talented artists. Photo appreaered in the Chicago Sun-Times in May 2005. I am in the center with bangs....


Blackstone Hotel art collection , "Better than a Museum", includes Joyce Owens


The Blackstone Hotel has played a prominent role in Chicago’s storied history since it opened more than a century ago, playing host to presidents, royalty, celebrities and even gangsters.

With an impressive art collection featuring more than 1,600 contemporary works of art, the luxury hotel continues to create a colorful legacy as a cultural destination in itself. In fact, it rivals some of the city’s most prestigious museums.

"The Blackstone has always been supportive of the artist community," says General Manager Kim Corrigan. "Its Beaux-Arts design is a work of art itself, and a dedicated art gallery was built within the original walls of the hotel upon its completion in 1910. Located on the Cultural Mile, it is only natural to bring this artistic spirit and creative culture to life every day for our guests and associates alike."

Committed to spotlighting Chicago and its local artists, the Blackstone Hotel recently commissioned new pieces to specifically represent the hotel, and made art the focus of both its public and private spaces. There is something interesting and beautiful to see everywhere you look, from the paintings in the lobby to the guest room key cards and do not disturb signs.

"What’s really special is that this world-class artwork isn't in a gallery or museum space," said Katherine Sharp of Nine dot Arts, who helped curate the project. "This is truly bringing art to the public, and that’s so important because people aren’t going to galleries the way they once did. The Blackstone is supporting artists in the best way possible: by actually buying their work for the hotel’s permanent collection and putting it on display for everyone to enjoy."

You can take a self-guided tour of the public pieces and relax with a drink at the unique Timothy’s Hutch. You’ll be able to sit and admire works like Painter by Celeste Rapone, which is placed prominently in the lobby to immediately put the importance of the art into focus.

But nothing beats staying at this iconic hotel and taking the elevator one story at a time to explore the different works of art that greet you on each floor.

Here are ten pieces you really need to see in person:

Painter by Celeste Rapone | Lobby

Artist by Celeste Rapone — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Celeste Rapone draws from themes of Dutch Golden Age painting, like portrait and still life. She loves to work with patterns and bold, often garish color palettes.

The artist in Painter doesn’t seem engaged in what they’re doing, which makes you want to know more about them. Rapone’s portraits are often referred to as “pretty” because the composition and color are on point but something is definitely off.

Portraits are expected to be beautiful, and this portrait hanging prominently in the lobby lets you know you’re in for lots of surprises as you explore the Blackstone’s art collection.

Orchid Stack VII by Stephen Eichhorn | Art Hall

Orchid Stack VII by Stephen Eichhorn — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Stephen Eichhorn has taken ikebana and floral arranging to a completely different level with his stunning series of orchid-based hand-cut collages.

They’re gorgeous from a distance, but the closer you get, the more awestruck you’ll be by his fluid, intuitive composition and the patterns, themes and textures he explores with such intricate detail.

The Blackstone Chronicle by Eric Garcia | 6th floor

The Blackstone Chronicle by Eric Garcia — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

You can learn so much about The Blackstone’s history through the graphic art of Eric Garcia.

Imbuing street art style with a historical perspective, he depicts The Blackstone’s reputation as “The Hotel of Presidents,” its place in movies like The Color of Money, its namesake, Timothy Blackstone, and its former owner, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. He doesn't leave out one of the hotel's most colorful guests, Al Capone, who used to hold meetings while getting his hair cut in the hotel’s windowless barbershop.

Neon Classic by Andrew LeMay Cox | 9th floor

Neon Classic by Andrew LeMay Cox — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Known for his renditions of paintings from influential artists throughout history, Andrew LeMay Cox has reinvented an Anthony Van Dyck portrait of Mary Villiers.

Deconstructing the themes of traditional Baroque art to satisfy contemporary standards of beauty, he dramatically changes the color palette and makes us look at the piece in an unexpected way.

Cooler by the Lake by Joyce Owens | 10th floor
Cooler by the Lake by Joyce Owens — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection
Painter and sculptor Joyce Owens is a figurative artist whose work addresses issues around race and gender.

Her style of portraiture is more narrative, and is very much about sharing a story. Cooler by the Lake features a Chicago landscape in the background and two fictional characters based on Lena Horne and Nat King Cole, both of whom were frequent guests of the hotel and who represent the Blackstone’s jazz history.

Brutalized Gainsborough by Chad Wys | 11th floor

Brutalized Gainsborough by Chad Wys — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Chad Wys’ signature collages juxtapose the old with the new. The woman in this piece may be dressed in period style clothing, but the addition of the brush marks immediately makes it a contemporary work. The big, gold, sculptural frame continues to play on this theme.

Although the hotel tried to get a commissioned piece from Wys, he said he couldn’t make any art in the new political climate. For that reason, Brutalized Gainsborough is one of the few works in the Blackstone that is a poster rather than an original piece of art.

R: 8:54; C: 15:51; L: 14:56 by Michelle Litvin | 12th floor

R 854; C 1551; L 1456 by Michelle Litvin (12th floor) — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Architectural photographer Michelle Litvin spent 24 hours in The Blackstone, documenting the architectural details that are unique to the hotel and to Chicago.

So much of the original building’s architecture was preserved, and in this triptych, Litvin captures a fireplace in a guest suite, a chandelier in the Grand Ballroom and a window in the English Room. The title is the time stamp of each of the three photos.


10BEST

Celebrating female innovators at the Racine Art Museum
Vandal Gummy Bear by WhIsBe | 14th floor

Vandal Gummy by WhIsBe — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Al Capone was sentenced to prison on October 17, 1931, and street artist WhIsBe pays homage to that infamous date with this irreverent piece, which is part of his Vandal Gummy Bear series.

The anonymous artist, whose name is short for What Is Beauty, creates prison mugshots of the sweet and much-loved candy bear holding an identity card to spark discussion and get people to explore their preconceptions.

Chicago Flamingos by Katarzyna Krol | 17th floor

Chicago Flamingos by Katarzyna Krol — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

Katarzyna Krol pays homage to Chicago’s legendary architecture with this charcoal and pastel drawing.

Her whimsical illustrations reveal the inspiration behind the 53-foot-tall Alexander Calder stabile which stands proudly on Federal Plaza. Often referred to as simply “the big red statue,” Krol ensures you will never forget its name.

Ideas Filled the Air by Matthew Hoffman | 21st floor

Ideas Filled the Air by Matthew Hoffman — Photo courtesy of The Blackstone, Autograph Collection

A picture may be worth a thousand words but Matthew Hoffman, the artist behind the three million “You Are Beautiful” stickers distributed around the world, uses both to create powerful statements.

This wood piece was commissioned for the hotel, and was inspired by Suite 915 where Republican leaders once met secretly to nominate Warren G. Harding as their party’s presidential candidate. The suite is popularly referred to as "the smoke filled room," thanks to an AP reporter who described the scene of the secret meeting.



http://www.10best.com/interests/hotels-resorts/the-blackstone-hotels-amazing-art-collection-is-better-than-a-museum/


9th Internation al Art open: WMG Gallery, Chicago


2006, March:
WON!
Ist place, 9th International Art Open at Woman Made Gallery juror: Margaret Hawkins, Chicago Sun-Times art critic, Artnews Magazine contributor (1200 entries from 400 artists internationally)


Chicago Tribune article


The Chicago Tribune feaured a circular Peace Mask by Joyce Owens in the December 4, 2005 newspaper. The work is acrylic on coconut shell with beads and wire adornments. The work was shown at Woman Made Gallery in Chicago () during the annual Holiday show. The writer is Pamela Sherrod.


Critical Review Dec 2007 Kevin Nance


Chicago Artists Month


Joyce Owens is wearing black and is in the rear, the tall woman with bangs...This is an annual event sponsored by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs to honor artists.
Owens was a featured artist in 2001 and her curatorial exhibition was featured in 2005.


Rolling Out Article 4-30-06


I was the featured artist for Dance Africa Chicago at Columbia College in 2006. I supplied the art work for the official poster and other print material. This feature in Rolling Out, a national publication, was the result of being selected from Chicago artists to receive that honor, following in the footsteps of Kerry James Marshall and Dayo Layoye.


Homewood Studios exhibition, Minneapolis, MN


This is Homewood Studios Gallery in Minneaplois, Minnesota. Here is the view of the gallery with two paintings by Joyce Owens and a ceramic piece by Marva Jolly.
We were invited by the gallery to exhibit there for a month, selected from a number of artists who sent their work for the jury.


ARC solo show Best of show, 2006


2006: February:
WON!
Best of Show, ARC Gallery, Chicago, juror, John Pittman Weber


2005:
Selected!
Signature artist, DanceAfrica Chicago at Columbia College, Chicago Illinois, work used on posters and advertisement citywide, cash prize (Kerry James Marshall was previous signature artist)

2005:
Selected!
Featured artist, Real Art Work (R.A.W) Chicago, Illinois, work used on all advertising and publicitity in print and on website, poster, etc.

Other awards and honors:

Black Creativity:
Best of Show!
and many other awards, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, Illinois
First place!
awarded by Faith Ringgold, the 5th International Art Open at Woman Made Gallery, Chicago, Illinois (1500 works submitted by 500 artist entries)
Juror!
curator!
for many exhibitions including The Art Center (Higland Park, Illinois), DuSable Museum, Chicago, Seaway Bank, Chicago, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, Concordia University, River Forest, Illinois, The Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago and A.R.C. Gallery, Wood Street Gallery and more.


Artist Statement


I believe in hard work and play!
Specifically transforming unlikely materials and art media to produce my art, and employing a variety of techniques including assemblage that requires basic wood working, jewelry making, printing and stamping, collage, sgraffito, etc., makes every new work a new investigation and puzzles I have to solve. As with a Google search, the elements I use can change the responses, sometimes dramatically. I like to work in series tending more towards 20 expressions on one visual or theoretical idea, but rarely isolated one-of-a-kind works.

I take, seemingly, unrelated expeditions that lead me to other ideas. I choose a chaos-to-order approach when I work, mostly enjoying not anticipating the exact results. Landscape is a re-occurring part of my paintings. I observe and photograph the land extensively; so far I have not shown the photos as stand alone art works.

Race issues are critical to my work; I measure my responses so the conversation does not accuse, but rather reminds and informs. Teaching is a natural instinct for me, lecturing about how artists addressed beauty, personal pain and injustice, religious beliefs and love.

I don't have the luxury to not address race, an issue that constantly touches my life and the lives of my family and friends, and is still a national dilemma. Gender issues are significant and are addressed in my art and in writing on my blog.

I never wonder what is next when it comes to my art practice. I never run out of ideas. I never feel that art making is a chore. It is my enduring passion and, my family aside, the love of my life.

The list of artists who have influenced my work is extensive.


Joyce Owens bio


Joyce Owens is a painter. She also creates sculptural works and masks. Owens earned a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Her main influences there were Lester Johnson and Bernard Chaet. Others who guided her at Yale were Willie Ruff, musician, William Bailey, artist and Al Held. Her undergraduate degree, Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), was conferred by Howard University in our nation’s capitol, Washington, D.C., where she studied with preeminent African American artists and scholars including David Driskell, the historian and curator of the Bill and Camille Cosby Collection, the late Lois Mailou Jones, internationally known painter, Ed Love, sculptor and Owens’ mentor until his premature death, historian and painter Dr. James Porter and printmaker and painter, James L. Wells. California artist Leo Robinson was an important guide during undergraduate years as was Lloyd McNeill

A professor of painting and drawing at Chicago State University, she also curates for the two on-campus galleries. Owens has been sought out to jury fine art exhibitions and art fairs at the Museum of Science and Industry, The DuSable Museum, Woman made Gallery, Women's Caucus for Art and The New East Side Art Fair to name a few. She has been a curator for many successful shows and an arts facilitator/consultant putting together artists with events. Owens is a knowledgeable arts panelist who has also developed discussion topics for galleries at Columbia College in Chicago, The Chicago department of Cultural Affairs, The School of the Art Institute, The Carver Museum in Austin, Texas and more. Owens has taught studio painting and drawing classes at Chicago State University since 1996 while also maintaining an active exhibition career. She has been sitting on the Advisory Committee for the Department of Cultural Affair’s Chicago Artists Month since 2002. She consults with the Chicago Artists Coalition, and is on the Advisory Board of Woman Made Gallery in Chicago. Owens is an associate editor for The Journal of African American History.

In college Owens was the art editor for Howard’s literary magazine for several years. She won the Student Council Award in Painting and The Special Talent Grant for three years, paying her tuition. She was also on the Dean’s list. While still an undergraduate McGraw-Hill hired Ms. Owens to illustrate two childrens’ books.

Joyce Owens is originally from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and attended Germantown High school where she excelled in art and was selected to be the editor of her high school year book among her other varied activities. She attended art classes at Philadelphia High School for Girls and Tyler School of Art on Saturdays. During her summers off, Ms. Owens worked as a camp counselor, becoming the Arts and Crafts Director for William Penn Camp when she graduated from Howard. During a summer after graduation she worked in a city of Philadelphia arts program with, now presidential portrait painter, Simmie Knox.

Owens taught art in a Philadelphia public school called the Franklin House. This facility was available to behaviorally disturbed students. Ms. Owens learned to teach reading in addition to art when she became aware of the need for more trained personnel in that area.

While a graduate student at Yale Ms. Owens was an art consultant teaching art in a public school program. She was also asked to create art for the Yale literary magazine and a poster for the historic Whiffenpoofs. At graduation she was selected the class marshall and won the Helen Winternitz Award in Painting.

Ms. Owens used her creative imagination to produce local programming for television in Philadelphia at the, then, CBS owned and operated station, WCAU. John Facenda, the voice of the NFL, was the talent for her broadcasts. Owens later moved to Chicago and worked for CBS in many capacities, finally becoming the station’s Graphics Coordinator for News. Ms. Owens left CBS after eight years to pursue her art career and start a family.

During the early child-rearing years her artistic output slowed. Among the few exhibitions Owens entered was the annual Black Creativity juried exhibition at the Museum of Science and Industry. Her work was included and received a cash award from sculptor and juror for the exhibition, Martin Puryear. She also won Best of show from head juror, Madeline Rabb, the former Director of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs.

After presenting a solo exhibition at Chicago State University Owens was asked to join the teaching staff in 1996 and has been teaching drawing, painting and art history since.

Ms. Owens has exhibited her work extensively including The Museum of Science and Industry’s annual juried Black Creativity exhibition where she won many prizes including Best of Show, Woman Made Gallery in Chicago where she won First Place in the 5th International Art Open from juror, internationally acclaimed artist, Faith Ringgold competing with 500 artists to win a solo exhibition. Owens also won First Prize in the 9th International Open at Woman Made Gallery in 2006, juried by the Chicago Sun-Times art critic and Artnews correspondent Margaret Hawkins, out of nearly 1200 international entries. Owens won “Best of Show” at ARC Gallery in February 2006, juried by John Pittman Weber. Both awards are solo exhibitions. Ms. Owens has exhibited at both Nicole Galleries, in River North and Bronzeville, Wood Street Gallery and Sculpture Garden was another venue for a solo exhibition as well as Elmhurst College, all in Chicago and Illinois. Owens exhibited at Connecticut College, The University of Pennsylvania Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She has exhibited work at the Butridge Gallery in Austin, Texas and at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts in a national juried exhibition. She was selected to exhibit at The Homewood Studios in Minneapolis, Minnesota in a two-person show with ceramic artist, Marva Pitchford Jolly.

Owens has been the curator for a number of exhibitions; one recent show, Sapphire and Crystals: Black, White and Blues was selected by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, out of hundreds submitted, as one of 12 featured programs for October’s Chicago Artists Month. She curated three different back-to-back shows from for the Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago in their Michigan Avenue gallery in the church’s loggia to rave reviews.

Owens was selected to be the 2005 signature artist for Columbia College’s DanceAfrica Chicago’s 15th annual festival following in the footsteps of Kerry James Marshall who was selected year before last. In September 2005 Owens was the featured artist for Real Art Work (R.A.W.) held at the Parkway Ballroom Chicago and also interviewed Paul R. Jones, the Atlanta collector who has the largest collection of African American work in the country. Owens’ work was featured on ABC7 and public television (Ch. 11 and Ch. 20) many times this year as well as the Chicago Tribune. Writer Pamela Sherrod wrote in praise of Ms. Owens’ work in an article on the extensive Daniel T. Parker collection.
She was interviewed for Public Television’s Art Beat program (Channel 11, WTTW) regarding her duties as juror for the Museum of Science and Industry’s Black Creativity exhibition and in another interview about her participation in the 8th Inernational Art Open, a juried exhibition at Woman Made Gallery. Nathaniel McLin, the host of Critic’s Corner, a city college radio show, has interviewed Ms. Owens for his show as well. She was also interviewed by the Pioneer Press in Oak Park about one of the three exhibitions she curated for the Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago in 2005.

The many publications that have shown or written about her work include 250 Years of Afro American Art by Igoe and Igoe, The Chicago Sun-Times and The Chicago Tribune, Chicago Magazine and The New Art Examiner, N’Digo newspaper, The Chicago Defender newspaper, Savoy Magazine, The Chicago Reader and others. WGCI radio selected her painting, Writers on the Roof as the cover image for the 1997 calendar that was distributed by five radio stations nationally. Her work has been used as cover art for a textbook published by a Chicago Tribune company. In 2005, Ms. Owens works were shown in the photographic illustration for an article on Daniel T. Parker’s book on the artists in his collection. Joyce Owens’ Survivor Spirit painting was selected as a work of interest by the writer, Pamela Sherrod. Owens has been interviewed about her own work and duties as a curator and juror on public radio and television. Her work was shown on WBBM TV (CBS2), ABC7 Chicago, PBS 11 and on television stations in Philadelphia. Owens’ work was featured on the Metromix show on CLTV, the Chicago Tribune station, hosted by Lee Ann Trotter during her solo exhibition at Woman Made Gallery in 2003. In 2004 Owens was also interviewed at the South Side Community Art Center about the gallery and its place in the “new” Bronzeville. Her work was also shown in the public television documentary “Curators of Culture” featuring such art luminaries as Elizabeth Catlett, Charles White and Gordon Parks.

Joyce Owens participated in the Suite Home Chicago public art project during the summer of 2001. The sofa she and the Windy City Arts group painted was displayed in front of the Art Institute of Chicago. She was a featured artist in Chicago Artists Month sponsored by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and photographed by Marc Hauser for all the city’s publicity materials. During this event Ms. Owens was the curator for the exhibition of Sapphire and Crystals collective at A.R.C. Gallery in Chicago a featured program selected by the department of Cultural Affairs.

In 2002 when the city selected her to participate on the prestigious advisory board for Chicago Artists Month she developed the theme that was used “Artists at Work“. This theme has continued to be a vital part of city programs to address artists’ issues. Ms. Owens was tapped by the city to contribute an article for CAR, the Chicago Artists resource website .

Joyce Owens has worked with the Illinois Arts Alliance and Illinois Arts Council to produce a workshop and is a member of the Art Institute and the Chicago Artists Coalition. Ms. Owens has been asked to jury exhibitions including head juror for the Museum of Science and Industry’s Black Creativity, Woman Made Gallery, the New East Side Art Fair, the Seaway Bank Art Fair and the DuSable Museum annual art fair.

In March 2006, Owens shared the podium with Chicago based artist Bernard Williams at Intuit Gallery in a discussion about each artists work. Joyce Owens was later asked to moderate a panel during Chicago Artists Month 2006 at Intuit Gallery entitled “Boundaries of Identity: An Artists: Dialogue” featuring a diverse group of Chicago-based artists. Owens participated in a scholarly panel at Columbia College discussing European Influences on African American Art. Owens has participated on and led panels at the South Side Community Art Center, The Open Door Gallery, Woman Made Gallery, Nicole Gallery and more.


Selected exhibitions and honors:

2011: “Ethereal Fauna”, group exhibition (catalog) at H.F. Johnson Gallery of Art, Carthage College, Kenosha Wisconsin; March 29- May 19

2011: CAAP grant panelist, Department of Cultural Affairs, 9am – 5 pm; April 8

2011: Lecture, “Joyce Owens Connects with Marc Chagall”, Art Institute of Chicago, Price Hall, March 5

2011: Museum of Greater Lafayette, Indiana; Parallel Narratives, two-person exhibition with sculptor Preston Jackson; January 21 – March 19

2011: Purdue University Black Cultural Center, lecture, January 21

2011: Museum of Greater Lafayette, Indiana; Led Painting workshop, on composition, balance, color harmonies and negative space; January 22

2011: Veeck Gallery, Dream Big, solo exhibition, Chicago; January 12 – April 6

2011: “Minority Art: Inspiration, Obligation”, group exhibition and discussion, Governor’s State University; featuring Kehinde Wiley, Floyd Atkins, Cleveland Dean, Joyce Owens, J. Thomas Pallas, Jeff Stevenson, February 28

2011 - 2010: Hyde Park Art Center, Not Just Another Pretty Face, Commissioning Project and Exhibition, November 21 – February 20

2010: Jackson Junge Gallery, Chicago, Tool Box, Flower Box, group exhibition; October 8 – November 14

2010: Southside Community Art Center, Friendships, group exhibition;
October 8 – 24

2010: Columbia College Center for Books and Paper, group exhibition, Mano/Mundo/Corazon: Artists Intepret La Lotería; September 11 – December 10

2010: Arterial Space, Salvage One group show, Woman Made Gallery;
October 7 – 31

2010: Southside Community Art Center, Postcard, group exhibition;
September 8 – 30

2010: DuSable Museum, Chicago; Common Bonds, group exhibition; May 12 – June 30

2010: CAAP grant panelist, Department of Cultural Affairs, 9am – 5 pm; April 16

2010: The Collection: The Narratives of Patric McCoy featuring the artwork of Daryl Harris, Judithe Hernandez, Thomas Lucas, Patric McCoy and Joyce Owens Sullivan Galleries, S.A.I.C. graduate exhibition, Samantha Hill; April 30

2010: Irish American Heritage Center, Touch of the Poet, group exhibition; March 5 – April 3

2010: Mosaic: faculty exhibition, Chicago State University; March 4 – April 2

2010: Curator and participating artist, Sapphire and Crystals: Visions, Elmhurst College Founder’s Lounge, Frick Center, Elmhurst, IL; January 24 – February 19

2010: Chicago Women’s Caucus for Art Award for Excellence in Art, Chicago Cultural Center; in conjunction with the Women’s Caucus for Art and College Art Association’s 2010 Annual Conferences, February 13

2010: Haiti fundraiser, Nicole Gallery, Chicago, IL; Jan. 29 to 31

2010: Art work selected for 3-year exhibition in the American Embassy, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

2009: Ragdale Fellowship, 3Arts Award and cash prize, nomination driven

2009: African American Arts Alliance Award for Excellence in the Visual Arts, DuSable Museum, nomination driven

2009: Featured artist: Homage to African-American Artists, U.S. Department of State date book includes Lou Stovall, Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe, Norman Lewis, Jacob Lawrence and Sam Gilliam

2009: Curator and participating artist, Sapphire and Crystals: Routes to Roots, Nicole Gallery, Chicago, IL; October 17 to December 12

2009: In the Company of Others…a group exhibition, South Side Community Art Center, Chicago, IL; November 14, - December 31

2009: One of three participating artists, The Dolls of J, at Eye Emporium Gallery, Chicago, IL; Oct. 16 to November 7, 2009

2009: Women Imaging Women: A Study of Female Portraiture, Robert Morris University, poster and postcard artist; July 9 – September 12

2009: Logsdon 1909 Gallery, No Borders, a group show curated by Diane Kahlo; May 8 – June 6

2009: Parish Gallery, From Slavery to Freedom: A Tribute to Obama, 2-person exhibition with Bobby Sengstacke, Washington, D.C.; Jan. 19 – Jan. 31

2009: Art work selected for 3-year exhibition in the American Embassy, Georgetown, Guyana.

2009: Curator, participating artist, Sapphire and Crystals: BEyONd Race and Gender, Noyes Cultural Arts Center, Evanston, IL; January 23 – March 12

2009: The Audacity of Art, Gallery D’Estee, featured artist, Chicago, IL; March 6, March 7.

2009: Solo exhibition, Chicago Public Library, Lincoln Belmont Branch, 1659 W. Melrose, 60657, March until May 5.

2009: Juried exhibition; Black Creativity, Dr. Kymberly Pinder, head juror, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, IL; Jan. 5 to March 1

2008 –2009: Group show, Crossed Borders/Crossed Cultures, Veeck Gallery, Catholic Theological Union, Hyde Park, Chicago, IL; November 13, 2008 – January 14, 2009

2008: Gallery Guichard Art di Gras, 3rd anniversary, Chicago, IL, Gallery talk.
August 8 – September 26

2008: Woman Made Gallery, annual Member’s Show, juried exhibition, August 1-August 28, Chicago, IL.

2008: Griffin Gallery, Four Women exhibition: Debra Hand, Felicia Grant-Preston, Karen Parisian and Joyce Owens, gallery talk, May 10- June 9, Chicago, IL.

2008: Mad Art Gallery, Venus Envy invitational (one of the 3 national artists invited. The other 15 artists were juried.) Mad Art Gallery, Gallery talk, March 7 to March 31, St. Louis, MO.

2008: President’s Gallery, Faculty Exhibition 2008, Chicago State University, the teaching faculty in Art and Design Department, March – May 2, Chicago, IL

2008: Lill Street Gallery, Favorite Things: Joyce Owens (paintings) and Thomas Lucas (prints and ceramic tiles). Gallery lecture: March 30, February 23 – March 31,

2008: Frances and Bill Veeck Gallery Shared History, 4-person show, The Catholic Theological Union, January 24 – March 28, Chicago, IL. Gallery talk.

2008; Emerging Energy, Art Therapy Exhibition, BEHIV Art; November 7, - December 6.

2008: TalkingPoint: Joyce Owens, lecture, slide show, Hyde Park Art Center, Muller Meeting Room: “Serial Art: If one is good more is better”; November 3, 2008, 6:00 PM.

2008; Chicago Public Art Group’s Art Auction Fundraiser Paint the Town! Prairie Productions on Randolph Street, Chicago, IL; October 16.

2008: 3-year exhibition, Monrovia, Liberia, U.S. Embassy

2008: Exhibition at NATO headquarters, Brussels, Belgium.

2008: Griffin Gallery, Chicago, Legacies exhibition, featured artist; October 3, November 5.

2008: Chicago Artists Coalition Art Open, Chicago Merchandise Mart; Chicago, October 3 – October 19, 2008

2008: Gallery Guichard, gallery artist, group show, Chicago, IL; October 2, 2008 - November 15.

2008: DuSable Museum of African American History, Chicago, The Citizen’s Picnic: Lynching in America from 1865 to Present; October 1– December 31.

2008: Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, Featured artist for Chicago Artists Resource;August 1 – August 31.

2008: recipient 3Arts Award, competitive nomination-driven fellowship recipient for 2009

2008: Museum of Science and Industry: Honorable Mention, Black Creativity Juried Exhibition: Jumaane N’Namdi head juror; January.
2008: Woman Made Gallery, annual Member’s Show, juried exhibition, August 1-August 28, Chicago, IL.

2008: January: Museum of Science and Industry Black Creativity annual juried art exhibition; (one of 7 prize winners out of over 500 entries), Museum of Science and Industry, January 16 - March 2, Chicago, IL.

2008: Woman Made Gallery juried Member’s Show, Chicago, IL., August 1 - August 28,

2008: South Side Community Art Center 43rd Annual Art Auction, May 17

2008: Carthage College, Wisconsin, solo exhibition; Colored: Expanding American History, April 12 until May 17, H.F. Johnson Gallery; gallery talk and reception Thursday April 17 www.carthage.edu/artgallery/schedule/

2008: Chicago State University Faculty Exhibition 2008: curator and
exhibiting faculty, President’s Gallery: March 7 until May 2

2008: Venus Envy exhibition, 10th anniversary: one of three national artists invited: Mad Art Gallery, St. Louis, MO March 7 until March 31
, one of the 3 national artists invited. The other 15 artists were juried.

2008: South Shore Arts, Munster, IL, The Diaspora and Beyond: Selected Works from the Daniel T. Parker Collection, February 3 - March 16.

2008: Elmhurst College, IL, Mind and Spirit: Paintings, solo exhibition, Frick Center, January 28 - February 22.

2008: Gallery D’Estee group show, honored Dr. Margaret Burroughs, Chicago, IL, February 29, March 1

2008: Catholic Theological Union, Chicago, IL, Shared History, four-person exhibition, Veeck Gallery, January 24 - March 28

2008: Museum of Science and Industry, Chi. IL., Black Creativity, 2008, won Honorable mention, juried exhibition; Jan. 16 - Feb. 29

2007: Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago, IL, Melvin King and Friends, Group exhibition, Melvin King, curator; January 13 -February 28

2007: Upstairs Gallery, Chicago, IL, Shared Vision: The Women of CSU, Group exhibition. Albert M. Shaw, curator, January 13 - February 28

2007: Concordia University, River Forest, IL, Memories: Real and Imagined, solo exhibition, January 8until February 3, Lecture: January 15, 2007

2007: Woman Made Gallery, Chicago, IL, solo exhibition: Black, White and Colored
2007: ARC Gallery, Chicago, IL, Re-Assignments, group exhibition, CURATOR/participating artist, June 27 until July 28, 2007

2007: Peace Tower Installation, Mark di Suvero
PUBLIC ART, Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, Il
Contributed panel that was on main construction, June 8 -October 1

2007, Woman Made Gallery, Chicago, IL, 15th Anniversary, group exhibition,
August 3 - August 30

2007: Koehnline Museum, Oakton Community College
Barbie Meets G.I. Joe, installation, Patrick Miceli, curator, September 6 - October 19

2007, Gallery Guichard, Chicago, IL, “Art di Gras” 2nd Year Anniversary, group exhibition, August 11 -September 16

2007: Nicole Gallery, River North, Chicago, IL, A Creative Alliance: Artists Who Teach, four-person exhibition: Joyce Owens, Preston Jackson, Thomas Lucas and Barlow, September 7 - November 3, Artists Panel October 20, 2007

2006: Black Faces: Rainbow Feelings, solo exhibition, ARC gallery, Chicago (prize for Best of Show from February 2006), October 4- October 28
Moderator for panel discussion with exhibiting gallery artists: Esther Charbit, Patricia Otto and Joyce Owens.

2006: Diasporal Rhythms Invitational, selected artist, Chicago State University, University Gallery, 2006

2006: The World Can’t Wait, invitational, Acme Arts Building, Chicago, IL
September 29 – October 14

2006: Migrations of the African Diaspora, juried exhibition, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, May 5 –August 20

2006: Butridge Gallery, Austin Texas, Boundless, invitational exhibition, (panel at Carver Museum), March 1 to March 30.

2006: ARC Gallery, juried exhibition, won Best of Show, John Pittman Weber, juror, February

2006: First Prize, 9th International Art Open, Woman Made Gallery: juror, Margaret Hawkins, art critic Chicago Sun-times; art correspondent Artnews; faculty, School of the Art Institute; March 2 – March 29.

2006: Best of Show, ARC Gallery, muralist John Pittman Weber, juror; February.

2006: Black Creativity, juried, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, IL. January-March

2006, ArtJaz Gallery, Philadelphia, PA, group show, January-February

2005: A Proud Continuum: Eight Decades of Art at Howard University, juried alumnae exhibition, Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., May - November


2005: Gallery Guichard, Chicago, IL; gallery artist from August 2005 to present.
2005: Sapphire and Crystals: Black White and Blues, Woman Made
Gallery: curator and exhibiting artist. Exhibition selected as featured program for Chicago Artists Month, October 7 – November 10

2005: Signature poster artist: DanceAfrica Chicago 15th Anniversary, Columbia College, Chicago, IL

2005: Poster and featured artist, R.A.W. Real Art Work: Vision Fine Art Fair, Chicago, IL

2005: Featured artist: Chicago Artists Resource, , Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs

2001: First Prize: 5th International Open, Woman Made Gallery, Faith Ringgold, juror, March.

2001: Featured: Chicago Artists Month, Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, October.

Selected Panels/Lectures:
2011: Department of Cultural Affairs, Chicago; Artists at Work Forum: Academic Museums and Galleries. Curators Joyce Owens (Chicago State University), Jennifer Murray (Columbia College) and Heather Weber (Northeastern Illinois University) about their experiences; share advice for applying. Moderator, by CAR Visual Art Researcher Lindsay Obermeyer.”

2011: Purdue University, lecture on “Parallel Narratives” 2-person exhibition with sculptor Preston Jackson at the Art Museum of Greater Lafayette, Indiana, Feb. 17
2010: Arts Alliance Illinois, Board of Directors meeting, panelist with Carolyn Patterson, Illinois State Museum, Barbara.Koenen, Chicago Dept. of Cultural Affairs; Esther Grimm, executive director 3Arts; Art Chicago Art Fair, Merchandise Mart; April 29

2010: Columbia College panelist: “Social Media, the News and Us for the Arts”; with Andrew Huff, Kerry Reid, Alex Meda, 8th floor theater; April 9

2010: College Art Association panelist, “Investigating the Need for Women's Art Galleries, Exhibitions, and Organizations: From Our Center”; February 11

2009: The Invisible Artist: Creators from the Southside panel; School of the Art Institute, Chicago, IL, March 26


2008: Artists at Work panel, Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, convened by prominent arts advocate Paul Klein that included: photographer Dawoud Bey, artist Tony Fitzpatrick, and sculptor Juan Angel Chavez, discuss ways to have a career as an artist. Chicago, IL; November 3.

2008: Gallery Guichard Art di Gras, 3rd anniversary, Chicago, IL, Gallery talk.
August 8 – September 26

Nicole Gallery, Panel discussion, A Creative Alliance: Artists Who Teach, group exhibition, October 20, 2007; River North, Chicago, IL with Preston Jackson, Thomas Lucas and Barlow.

2007: Concordia University, solo exhibition and gallery lecture, January 15; January 8 – February 3.

2006: Chicago Cultural Center, Department of Cultural Affairs, Artists at Work panel discussion, “Not the Old Boys Network”, Nov. 16, also aired on Chicago’s CAN TV on Jan. 7, 2007.

2006: Intuit Gallery during Chicago Artists Month “Beyond Boundaries” panel, moderator, October 27. Panelists include: David Philpot, Mary Ellen Croteau, Judith Roth, Michelle Stutts

2006: Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Symposium artist/panelist, Migrations of the African Diaspora juried exhibition, August 19, Pittsburgh, PA.

2006: Carver Museum: Boundless exhibition, panel, March, Austin, Texas.

2005: DanceAfrica Chicago at Columbia College, October, Humanities Festival, panelist,

2005: (R.A.W.) Real Art Work: Vision, Interview and discussion with Paul R. Jones, Paul R. Jones Collection, Sept. 30.

2004: Columbia College, Chicago, lecture graduate art students, Julia Fabris McBride’s

2003: Illinois Arts Council, workshop with state arts administrators.

2003: Nicole Gallery, Women’s Global Art: Consciousness and Conditions, panelist, March.

2003: South Side Community Art Center, panelist, Julia Perkins, moderator.

Selected Radio/Television:

2010: DuSable to Obama: Chicago’s Black Metropolis”, WTTW, Ch. 11 TV, interviewee, curator of the Bobby Sengstacke exhibition at CSU; premier; June 7

2010: Channel 20, Cliff Kelly and WVON: CSU promotional simulcast

October 13, 2006: 848 show, WBEZ public radio, “State of Black Arts”; guests: Joyce Owens, Chicago State University, Michael Warr, DanceAfrica Chicago producer, Chuck Smith, resident director of the Goodman theatre

2005: ArtBeat Chicago, Interview as juror of Black Creativity, Museum of Science and Industry Metromix, Leeann Trotter, host, solo show at Woman Made Gallery shown

2005: Curators of Culture documentary, WYCC, Channel 20, name and work shown

2005: ABC7, art work shown in conjunction with Gallery Guichard

2003: Aaron Freeman, host, Metropolis, panelist with Kerry James Marshall, WBEZ Radio

Recent articles, publications:

2011: Cover artist, “Our Difficult Sunlight” A Guide to Poetry, Literacy, & Social Justice in Classroom & Community” Georgia A. Popoff & Quraysh Ali Lansana, About the Artist, page 210, launched at University of Illinois, Feb.

2011: Lafayette, Indiana, Journal and Courier, “Parallel Narratives exhibit is an exciting addition to art scene” By TOM SHAFER • review, Special to the Journal & Courier • January 30

2011: Lafayette, Indiana, Journal and Courier, TGIF, “Bright History” “Adam Who Is Your Daddy, full-page illustration, inset on page 1; January 21

2010: Art in Embassies catalog, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

2010: Fear No Art, online and WTTW, Ch. 11; A Creative Space: Richard Hunt’s studio; republished

2010: Matisse: Radical Invention at Art Institute of Chicago, preview; Chicago Art Magazine, March 19

2009: Studio Chicago, A Creative Space: Richard Hunt's Studio. .../creative-space-richard-hunts-studio.html
Department of Cultural Affairs; Chicago, IL, Dec.

2009: Chicago Art Map, Do Collectors Owe Profits to Artists? 2009/12/01/do-collectors-owe-profits-to-artists/
Dec. 1

2009: Artist’s Idyll in Illinois, Art Talk Chicago
blogs/art-talk-chicago//artists-idyll.html
Chicago Now blogs, July

2009: Nonsense, The Journal and Collector’s Guide, book review, The Art of Romare Bearden, Ruth Fine, June

2009: Art in Embassies catalog, Monrovia, Liberia, May

2009: Art in Embassies catalog, NATO headquarters, Brussels, Belgium, May

2007: Chicago Sun-Times, Year-end review, “In Art, Triumph and Controversy”, Kevin Nance, art critic, Nicole Gallery show with Preston Jackson selected as one top 10 shows for the year 2007; December 23.

2007: Chicago Sun-Times review, “Recommended” by Kevin Nance, art critic; Sept 21.

2007: N’digo Magapaper “The Fine Art of Collecting Art”, Dan Parker
July 5 to July11 issue

2006: History Makers interview: by founder, Julianna Richardson at the University of Illinois, November.

2006: Journal of African American History, reviewed Faith Ringgold’s autobiography “We Flew Over the Bridge”, Winter issue

2006: Pittsburgh Tribune, May, 5, critical review by Kurt Shaw, work shown in photograph.

2006: Rolling Out newspaper: March 30, feature story by Tony Binns (with photo) about selection as signature artist for DanceAfrica Chicago at Columbia College.

2006: A-N Magazine, British art publication, feature story with image by Tom Burtonwood. About the artists on Chicago Artists Resource website, March 1

2004: A Proud Continuum: Eight Decades of Art at Howard University featured on catalog cover, essay and selected art on Howard website, published May

2005: Savoy Magazine, “Collecting African American Art” by Halima Taha, p. 40, .April/May

2005: African American Art: The Diaspora and Beyond, page 77, Daniel T. Parker

2003: The Art of Culture: Evolution of Visual Arts by African American Artists, The Last Fifty Years, page 48, Africa International House


Recent Curatorial:

2010: Curator and participating artist, Sapphire and Crystals: Visions, Elmhurst College Founder’s Lounge, Frick Center, Elmhurst, IL; January 24 – February 19

2009: Curator and participating artist, Sapphire and Crystals: Routes to Roots, Nicole Gallery, Chicago, IL; October 17 to December 12

2007: ARC Gallery, Chicago, Il, “Re-Assignments”, curator /participating artist
June 27 until July 28

2006 to present: Chicago State University, Curator for the Galleries Program,

2006: The Art Center located in Highland Park Ill featuring the works of a diverse group of artists including Preston Jackson, Anna M. Tyler and May O’Shaughnessy and others from Nov. 10 to Dec. 5.

2005: The Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago:
Hot Images for Cold Times, Jan.
The Dream Revisited, II, Feb.
Sapphire and Crystals, March

2004: Concordia University, Sapphire and Crystals: In Black and White, February

Additional Curator or judge duties:

The DuSable Museum, Wood Street Gallery, ARC Gallery, Seaway National Bank, and the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago.

Board memberships:

Editorial board of the Journal of African American History since 2001

Advisory Board of Woman Made Gallery since 2004

Advisory Board for Department of Cultural Affairs and City of Chicago’s Chicago Artists Month since 2001

Other Memberships:

Woman Made Gallery

Chicago Artists Coalition

Sapphire and Crystals collaborative

Academic Committees:

University:

Buildings and Grounds
College: Love of Learning
Department: Recruitment and Retention
Department: Gallery Committee, Chair
Department: Webpage

Community Service:

Museum of Science and Industry, Black Creativity: adviser, ongoing
Wells Street Art Fair: juror, 2011
Old Town Art fair, juror, 2011
Little Black Pearl; Advisory Committee meeting with Madeleine Grynszteijn, Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Dec. 9, 2011
The Chicago Defender: reader for Bud Billikin essays, 2010
Chicago Artists Month, Advisory Committee since 2001
Chicago Artist Resource, advisor
Chicago Artists Coalition, Artist Advisory Committee, 2010


Year End Recognition in the Chicago Sun-Times: Kevin Nance, art critic


In art, triumph and controversy
December 23, 2007
BY KEVIN NANCE Sunday Show Editor
The year 2007 was one of upheaval, reconfiguration and even a modicum of controversy for the visual arts in Chicago.
Within the past 12 months, the City Council passed a revision of the city's Public Art Ordinance, giving the Department of Cultural Affairs greater control over the city's public art program and provoking a rare, spirited but ultimately unsuccessful public protest by artists and their supporters. The year also brought the end of a series of lawsuits against the department by attorney Scott Hodes, who lost in court.
It was a trying year, too, for Chicago art dealer Richard H. Love, who was beset by a series of lawsuits alleging that he failed to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to clients who had given him artworks to sell on consignment.
On a more positive note, 2007 saw the resurgence of Art Chicago, the once-failing art fair successfully resurrected at the Merchandise Mart as part of a larger collection of shows and events known as Artropolis. The Chicago-based Terra Foundation generously funded "American Art American City," a much-needed (and ongoing) initiative drawing attention to the city's American art offerings.
There were also several notable museum exhibits, including group and solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Chicago Cultural Center and the Chicago History Museum, as well as a number of terrific efforts by galleries. Here are the ones I'll remember most, in alphabetical order:
**Zana Briski: "Brothel" at the Stephen Daiter Gallery. The Oscar-winning creator of "Born into Brothels" offered a moody yet surprisingly luminous show of photographs of the Calcutta red-light district.
**Mark di Suvero sculpture in Millennium Park. These giant, oddly accessible metal structures added a touch of quirky, people-friendly modernism to Chicago's signature public art space.
**Judith Geichman: "Soak" at the Alfedena Gallery. Gorgeous, evocative abstract work by an underappreciated Chicago artist.
**Krueck + Sexton: Facade of the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies, 610 S. Michigan. Yes, it's architecture, but this beautiful composition in glass is also high art.
**"New Narratives: Contemporary Art from India" at the Chicago Cultural Center. This fantastic group exhibit showed how Indian artists are engaging with the international art world while maintaining a connection to their national traditions.
**Audrey Niffenegger: "Elegy for Isabella Blow" at Printworks Gallery. In this lovingly macabre tribute to an eccentric British style icon, the author of The Time Traveler's Wife proved once again that she can do far more than write.
**Joyce Owens and Preston Jackson: "Artists Who Teach" at the Nicole Gallery. This painter and sculptor dominated a fine show of Chicago-based African-American artists with images of a real and imagined black history.
**Art Shay in two retrospectives at the Chicago History Museum and the Daiter Gallery. The veteran photojournalist got a fresh look as an artist and Chicago treasure.
**Rudolf Stingel at MCA. The Italian-American artist got a well-deserved retrospective highlighting his parallel, complementary work in photorealism and conceptual art.
**Jeff Wall at the Art Institute. The master Canadian photographer's monumental light-box photographs got the star treatment they deserved in this stunning show.
**Karl Wirsum: "Winsome Works(some)" at the Cultural Center. The Chicago Imagist got a big, satisfying, long-belated retrospective that suggested the darker depths beneath his sunny surfaces and obsessive wordplay.