Jim Fischer


Follow
Painting, Collages ... 71 Followers Member since 2018
Jersey City, New Jersey, United States

Artist News Jim Fischer

Added Nov 18, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What's on the Easel, November 2020

What’s On The Easel

November 2020, Vol. II, No. 11

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

To tell the truth…

 

…nada. The creative muse has taken a hiatus, no projects come to mind to engage my passion. So, I have moved to other distractions awaiting the Goddess of Creativity to once again strike me. And there’s plenty to keep me busy like winterizing the gardens and taking care of long overdue tasks around the house (including such things as getting the rugs cleaned and having the heating system checked out before winter sets in). 

 

Another obsession. 

 

Then there is the ship, the Volante. Just how did I get into this? When I married my first wife in 1972 we had no money so for a honeymoon we drove up to Mystic Seaport for a long weekend. I was blown away by the models in their museum. There was a small model in the gift shop priced at a mere $600, way out of reach for me, so, being someone who believes that if a human being can do it, so can I, I started making models. In fact, that’s all I did in my spare time for the next eight years (and how I got back to doing art is another story). I made six models, three large ones (the three smaller ones were used to test techniques for use on the larger ones). Three models survive, The Charles Morgan, The Constitution (which I have) and the Gjoa (the test model for the Constitution). The large model of the Flying Fish was destroyed by a football in my sister-in-law’s living room, two of the small ones have vanished. 

 

Morgan.jpg

And here I am, back in the model ship business. The project is proving challenging and rewarding. Progress is slow as shown by this month’s productivity, but it’s fun.

 

Ship.jpg

A bit about the ship.

 

Why the Volante? Two reasons: I wanted to do something in a larger scale, 1/4 inch to the foot rather than the standard 1/8. This would allow for more detail. I originally wanted to do a clipper ship, the Flying Cloud or Flying Fish but, at that scale the model would be over 7 feet long, not practical for home display. The Volante, officially a brig (two square rigged masts) has all the features of clipper ship design (the pinnacle of large sailing ship design soon replaced by steam).

 

The second reason is the history of the ship itself. The Volante is typical of the smaller sailing ships used by the Confederacy to run the Union blockade, small and fast (you might recall what Rhett Butler did during the war). In fact, the ship was captured by the U.S.S. Virginia off the coast of Texas in early 1864 as it tried to enter Galveston harbor (and I’m debating putting the gallows at the top of the main mast that they would use to hang the traitorous captain as they sailed their prize into New Orleans harbor).

 

And the holidays are approaching

 

It was time to design this year’s holiday card.

 

P1000745.JPG

And the Imagination series continues with the smallest piece yet, Die Fledermaus at only 2 1/2” x 1”.

 

Die Fledermaus.jpg

Helping a friend …

 

During this ‘downtime’ my large format printer needs to run on a regular basis. So I’m helping a friend develop a series of place mats. Something else to do as I await the muse to strike (not to worry, this has happened before, you can only keep the creative drive at bay for a while).

 

P1000740.JPG

Last but not least, having some fun

Meet the Covids - Vacation in Venice

 

Covids.jpg

That’s all for now. Be well. And what’s on your easel?

 

Jim

 

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’

To subscribe to this monthly email, drop me a note at theartistjimfischer@yahoo.com


Added Oct 23, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What's on the Easel, October 2020

What’s On The Easel

October 2020, Vol. II, No. 10

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

Finished…

 

Sunday at the Beach_Oil on canvas_36x38_2020_2,000.JPG

An interesting confluence of art…

 

Hanging around my studio for the past 40 odd years has been a small watercolor, one of my first of a person and part of the Jones Beach series. When I finished the painting this month the woman crossing behind the first red flag looked familiar. Sure enough, it’s the same woman in the watercolor. We must have been walking down the beach together, me a little faster than her. Together again after all these decades!

 

P1000718.JPG

Also finished.. 

 

..a small (8x10) portrait of Steph’s niece, Cody, who is somewhat trapped by covid in Oxford, England, and going to school. (hi, Cody)

 

Cody.jpg

Masks…

 

Steph and Natalie continue to evolve the mask business. They just completed a nice order for Uncommon Goods combining Steph’s new mask design with Nat’s jewelry. Go take a look at their handiwork at https://www.uncommongoods.com/product/handmade-mask-necklace-set 

 

52748_1_640px.jpg

The ship evolves…

 

P1000724.JPG

The ship project has evolved into something I needed, a distraction from the art studio. Forcing the art process has never really worked for me, projects need to be enthusiastically embraced and to be real, that’s not a constant state of being. Sooooooo, the ship gives me something to occupy the ‘artistic downtime.’ It also is helping me keep away from the studio when I should. It’s too easy to spend everyday, seven days a week, in the studio. Now I am spending my weekends on the ship. Like the nine-to-fivers, I get two days off a week!

 

That’s all for now. Be well. And what’s on your easel?

 

Jim


Added Oct 2, 2020
Permalink | Comments

New works

As I continue my Imagination: Serendipitous Reality series, take a look at my latest works including Ningyo (Fishman), Icebergs, Starships Afire, and Charge of the Light Brigade. Thank you for your support.


Added Sep 24, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel September 2020

What’s On The Easel September 2020, Vol. II, No. 8

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

Almost…

 

What’s on the easel? Well, the same thing as last month (and the month before) but now it is almost finished. 

 

P1000717.JPG

And, as I finish up, opportunities for the Imagination series continue to develop.

 

31.jpg

These are “Attack Ships Afire Off the Shoulder of Orion” on the left and “The Charge of the Light Brigade” on the right.

 

And now for something completely different!

 

As many of you know, back in the 70s I took a long hiatus from doing art (6 years to be exact) and did, tadda, model ships. I finished six with a seventh one unfinished. Just the hull of the Volante (New York, 1853) got done and it has been following me around for 40 years and six moves now. Sooooooo, looking for something to fill the extra hours in lock down this winter (now spent in the garden), I have decided to finish the ship. I estimate, with a couple hours a day, it will take about two years to complete. I have no clue what I will do with the finished model. Occasional updates will be posted for your amusement. 

 

P1000716.JPG

In the garden this month…

 

Video link: Some help mowing the lawn, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zukeT-QMH5Q (cut and paste URL in new window to view on youtube)

 

Important topics Steph and I discuss as we continue in lock down (Fauci says until end 2021. Ouch!).

 

Besides the continuing entertainment from politics, Steph and I have been discussing movies. Watching a comedy the other night we got on the topic of what we considered to be the funniest movies we’ve ever seen. We got six so far: Blazing Saddles (hands down #1, “Where be the white women?”), The Big Lebowski (“Not on the rug, man”), Animal House (“Road trip!”), Life of Brian (“Always look on the sunny side of life”), Gold Member (“At first I thought you were crazy, now I see your nuts”) and Duck Soup (“Pick a card, any card. That’s okay, you can keep it, I got 51 more.”). Now, using these as our standard (gotta be way out there crazy funny), we’re stuck. Most others, while funny, were no where near as persistently insane as these (well, maybe Oh, Brother (“We’re in a tight spot”)). Any ideas?

 

That’s all for now. Be well. And what’s on your easel?

 

Jim

 

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’

To subscribe to this monthly email, drop me a note at theartistjimfischer@yahoo.com


Added Sep 24, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel August 2020

What’s On The Easel August 2020, Vol. II, No. 7

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

Looks can be deceiving.

 

P1000664.JPG

What’s on the easel? Well, the same thing as last month or so it appears. 

 

The reality is very different and demonstrates the process of art; sporadic and contemplative. For the past month I have been unsure of the next steps in continuing this painting. So, I stopped painting and started contemplating. I see the piece every time I am in the studio (which is a lot) and think out my next steps. Yes, I am painting in my head and, when the time is right I will continue to paint. Maybe it will be done by next month’s newsletter, maybe not.

 

But, I’m not sitting on my hands…

 

The watercolor is finished. And if anyone is interested in having it, just drop me a note (first come, first serve).

 

Flags watercolor.jpg

Small pieces continue to be created from the scraps of the large work.

 

Untitled-1.jpg

These are particularly small pieces, 3x5 and 4x4 (and, if you're paying attention you will see the colors I have used on the large painting thus far). On the left is “The Doomed Cricket” and on the right “Butterflies (Disney effect).” I have also spent my time creating a box set of high quality prints for the entire collection, called “Imagination: Serendipetous Reality,” with 64 pieces already done and more on the way I’m sure. Regarding the creation of these little gems, I quote Leonardo DiVinci:

 

"You may discover in the patterns on the wall a resemblance to various landscapes, adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, plains, wide valleys and hills in varied arrangement; or again you may see battles and figures in action; or strange faces and costumes, and an endless variety of objects, which you could turn into complete and well drawn forms. The effect produced by these mottled walls is like that of the sound of bells, in which you may recognize any name or word you choose to imagine." Leonardo DiVinci

 

The big news is the garden

 

A bumper crop harvest of garlic was collected; 

Untitled-2.jpg

drying,                             curing,              trimming                        and done.

 

And, with over 400 plum tomatoes, we have one gallon of marinara sauce already, another on the way.

 

Untitled-4.jpg

This year’s BBQ

Was, of course, canceled but we did our best to celebrate my 70th birthday with brother Rick and Jean. 

 

Untitled-3.jpg

Hopefully we will be back on track next year for the 20th anniversary of our annual BBQ.

 

Lastly

 

The house behind us has been demolished. Built in the 1860s when the Heights was a summer community (facing west on what is now called the Western Slope and getting a constant breeze off the Meadow Lands), the house was too small by today’s standards. They will build a monster two family that looks like a WW1 army barracks (affectionately known as a ‘Bayonne Box’). So it goes, I guess.

 

Untitled-5.jpg

That’s all for now. Everyone be well. And what’s on your easel?

 

Jim

 

P1000650.JPG

The Master Mask Seamstress at work!

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’

To subscribe to this monthly email, drop me a note at theartistjimfischer@yahoo.com


Added Sep 24, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel July 2020

What’s On The Easel July 2020, Vol. II, No. 7

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

“Because photography is not good enough”

 

That’s what the artist David Hockney told an interviewer when asked why, in today’s art environment, he continued to paint in a realist style. He went on to clarify by saying that all photographs are a compromise of something, only the art of painting allows the creator to control what the viewer will ultimately see. And nothing demonstrates this more than the piece I am currently painting. If you compare the painting, it’s sky and sea, to the photo I am using you will see a clear demonstration of this idea.

 

P1000615.JPG

“All painting is a trick of the eye”…

 

Is what the realist painter, Leonardo Da Vinci had to say in his defense of why painting is, by far, the superior art form (a debate he won). Take, for example, the watercolor I am working on alongside the oil. See the group of figures in the distance on the right?


P1000614.JPG

Now take a closer look.


P1000624.JPG

Da Vinci, during his study of sight, noted that the further away an object was the less distinct to the eye. He advised painters to follow this rule when doing distance painting. I call it the ‘six feet’ rule. When I paint I imagine the viewer standing six feet from the piece and adjust the clarity of distance accordingly, thus tricking the eye.

 

And then there is the kale…

 

…and the pole beans, and the tomatoes, and the garlic (ready to be harvested) and the basil (amazingly grown from seed). The garden is producing fresh veggies and providing a much needed distraction as we continue to hunker down in this world of Covid-19. We hope everyone is staying safe as well.

 

Veggies.jpg

Our new business opportunity

 

A new family business has emerged from the pandemic, masks.


P1000626.JPG

Researching designs and adding some innovations, with Stephs considerable seamstress talents we are producing masks to sell through Natalie’s jewelry customer resources. We learned that a three ply cotton mask, with quilt batting as the center filter, is very effective (above 80% and washable). I figured out a way to get a piece of wire into the top to bend over the nose and we found a design that covers most of the lower face, reaching far around the sides and using laces to tie tightly around the back of the head rather than hanging off the ears. Add a stylish vintage fabric and there you go. We have sold about $1,000 worth already at $25 each. Who would know that a young, rural Iowa  girl’s sewing lessons would come in so handy.

 

That’s all for now. Everyone be well. And what’s on your easel?

 

Jim

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’

To subscribe to this monthly email, drop me a note at theartistjimfischer@yahoo.com


Added Sep 24, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel June 2020

What’s On The Easel June 2020, Vol. II, No. 6

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

As previously noted, Niagara in Winter/Horseshoe Falls Rapids is finished …


… and in it’s new home in our dining room.

 

P1000578.JPG

So, What is on the Easel?

 

Yup, you got it, nothing again!

 

P1000575.JPG

Actually, I found an old slide from the Jones Beach series that I had been meaning to do as a large painting. It’s been around for 35 years, amazing it survived. It’s next. The canvas is being prepared in the shop.

 

beach1.jpg

One problem, while my scanner has an optional attachment for scanning slides and negatives, it costs $600. I don’t have enough slides to warrant the expense. Soooooooo, 

I rigged up something with a light behind it and it worked! 

 

P1000580.JPG

You know, sometimes low tech is the way to go.


Something else to do, a watercolor

 

Here’s another view of my studio, the watercolor station where a different version of the Jones Beach ‘Flags’ piece is set to be done. There are actually seven work stations in the studio: Easel for oils, a counter/sink for set-ups and messy things, a drawing board for colored pencil work, a small rolling table for small pastels (the Whistlers were done on it), a desk for general computer use, a watercolor station and a printer/scanner computer station. All in 144 square feet.

 

P1000574.JPG

Nice natural light in the afternoons and a pleasant view of …

 

The garden

 

After an unusually cool Spring (I was truly worried much would be lost) the vegetable and herb gardens are chugging away. With the pandemic lockdown, the garden is our safe haven now. Lockdown is not so bad with this… 

 

P1000572.JPG

A Manifesto of Sorts … Why I do this, part 5, The Finale.

 

Using My Gifts, Testing My Limits (10)

 

I am blessed by God with some extraordinary gifts: perception, memory, coordination, confidence, and many more. But they mean nothing unless I develop them into specific talents. I find that doing art (of all kinds) is the absolute test of my ability to manage God’s gifts into something worthy of having them. That’s why, among all the talents I have, doing art has always been at the top of my list (and I believe I have attained great heights in my pursuit of this endeavor). I know I can leave this world with a smile on my lips and, when I stand in front of God and he asks me what I did with the gifts he gave me, I will have one word; “Art.”

 

That’s all for now. Everyone be well. And what’s on your easel?

 

Jim

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’

To subscribe to this monthly email, drop me a note at theartistjimfischer@yahoo.com


Added Sep 24, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel May 2020

What’s On The Easel May 2020, Vol. II, No. 5

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

So, What is on the Easel?

 

Finally got going on the canvas.

 

P1000532.JPG


The pallet is kinda limited, just three colors plus black and white. 

 

P1000534.JPG


And, of course, there are ancillary works coming out of this piece from the wiping rags. This one, at the unusual size of 14x11, is titled “And there was war in heaven (Revelations 12:7)”

 

jan037.jpg

Minerva Restored, A Strange Tale

 

So, if you’ve been out in our back garden you will recall a statue of Minerva giving the gift of grapes to a young Bacchus. It was a plaster cast of an original 1890s French sculpture made into a lamp I bought 15 years ago at a yard sale for $20 and refurbished in bronze paint. Well, plaster doesn’t do well exposed to the elements so, after all this time, and patching, she finally fell apart. Ah, but then fate intervened. 

 

One day, pre-lock down, I was on my way down our block to an appointment. At the end of the block there was a dumpster and two workers hauling garbage cans full of brick-a-brack and household items from the house. The old lady who lived there alone had died (happens when you live in an old neighborhood, and the workers were just tossing everything. I decided to go I and have a look. Inside the workers continued their cleaning out and, just as I walked into the living room I saw one of them about to toss a triangular box with an American flag into the garbage can he was filling along with a photograph of someone in the Air Force circa 1960s. “You can’t do that with that flag.” I said, grabbing it out of his hands, “This needs to be properly disposed of.” He showed me a table where he said the boss man was putting things to keep. I put the flag there and told them to tell him to do the right thing with it. I saw the Minerva statue in a corner but, now running late, I moved on. 

 

On the way home from the meeting the dumpster was still there and the workers were gone, the house closed up. But, there on the sidewalk, right in my path, was Minerva waiting for me. I picked her up, took her home and bronzed her like the previous one. She now presides over our back garden again. It appears God was thanking me for my small good deed and we have a new Minerva for the garden.

 

Minerva.jpg

Natalie Makes the Big Time

 

So, sooner or later you might come across Michael’s, the craft supply store’s latest advertising campaign featuring (tadda!) our daughter, Natalie. She has been chosen to represent them as a maker for craft jewelry. They spent a day filming and interviewing here for the campaign (and, of course, paid her handsomely as well). Perhaps not by coincidence, since the campaign launched Nat has had a stead stream of business. She told us the other day she was walking down a street and someone recognized her from the campaign, mask on and all. We’re thrilled.

 

workingon-img8-Etymologyjewelry.jpg

Another Kind of Art

 

That’s right, bread. In the spirit of ‘sheltering in place’ I decided to make some baguettes and something called War Bread (a hodge podge of flours traditionally made during times of want with what ever was at hand). 

 

bread.jpg

And in this time of suffering, yes, there is still some beauty, as in last night’s sunset from our porch.

 

P1000526.JPG

A Manifesto of Sorts … Why I do this, part 4.

 

Proselytizing (1)

 

This word seems to define today’s artist. Sending a message through art is the ‘hot thing’ to do, it’s, as one curator said, “cutting edge.” What ever happened to just the pursuit of beauty. I don’t do art to convert or convince anyone, I do it to entertain myself and others with something beautiful. After careful reflection (and reading War and Peace, twice) I have come to the conclusion that the purpose of life is the pursuit of beauty (Plato agrees). This is a big reason why I do my art, the only message being sent? Enjoy!

 

That’s all for now. Everyone be well. And what’s on your easel?

 

Jim

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’

To subscribe to this monthly email, drop me a note at theartistjimfischer@yahoo.com


Added Sep 24, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel, April 2020

What’s On The Easel, April 2020, Vol. II, No. 4

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

So, What is on the Easel?

 

That’s right, a blank canvas. You gotta start somewhere. And don’t be fooled, it takes a lot of effort to prepare a canvas. This one if for the bigger version of Niagara’s Horseshoe Falls (picture to the left). It will take about two weeks when I decide to get off my butt and pick up a brush.

 

P1000493.JPG

But that’s not to say I’ve been idle.

 

Io’s head in Leaded Glass

 

Io.jpg

This project has been around a while, became necessary when I gave away the piece that was in the kitchen window (I’m a sucker for the “I love that” exclamation. “Really? You want it, it’s yours). The original I worked from was a smaller piece Steph uses as her logo with her jewelry line, Nyx Jewelry (Nyx being the Greek goddess of night).

 

Discovered! The Ultimate, Can’t Fail Coronavirus Cure

 

Soup.jpg

That’s right, it’s chicken soup (I have it on the good word of a little old lady down the block). We keep the left over chicken and turkey bones in the freezer and every few months I make broth. This time, given the covid-19 situation, I decided to make some of it into chicken soup. The meat comes from picking the bones after steeping the broth (you’d be surprised how much meat is left on them after a meal). I also got six quarts of broth and we’re already starting to gather another batch of bones for the next time around.

 

Another Artist Inspires a Book

 

I got this promotional email from a fellow Jersey City artist announcing the publication of a book of his art, What Would Jesus Draw? (and, of course, soliciting purchases). Well, I sorta took offense at the artists presumptuous attitude with regard to Jesus and I got inspired. This month continued to see a flow of what I call Serendipitous Realist works. Many of them are in uncomfortable themes, death, evil, etc. So, I decided to do a limited edition book of my works call What Satan Would Paint.

 

Satan2.jpg

Featuring The Four Horseman of the Apocalypse (of course). White, Red, Black and Pale

 

4 horsemen.jpg

It’s not available yet, not finished yet, needs three more pieces to make the required 20. They will come, although, given the nature of the creative method I’m using, I haven’t a clue when or what top. 

 

A Manifesto of Sorts … Why I do this, part 3.

 

Posterity (8)

 

Ah, if you can’t have fame now you can at least extend your life through your work. I agree. It is my observation that most people are forgotten 100 years after their death (maybe a few photographs survive with the verbal coda “That’s my…”). That’s it. So, is art a way to extend my presence into the future after I’m gone? Well, maybe. Most of the art being done today, in my opinion, will land on the garbage heap within that same 100 year time frame of memory (yes, there’s a lot of bad work out there). History has shown that only a small handful of artists can break through this barrier .. except those who paint portraits! Even bad (called ‘naive’) portraits survive (as witnessed on Antiques Roadshow). So, in recent years I have focused on doing portraits of my friends and family (and, of course, commissions). It is hard to imagine them not being passed down in the families for many years until some day, 300 years from now, someone will point to my work and say, “That’s my great, great…” And my name will be on it!

 

That’s all for now.

 

Everyone be well.

 

Jim

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’

To subscribe to this monthly email, drop me a note at theartistjimfischer@yahoo.com


Added Sep 24, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel March 2020, Vol. II, No. 3

What’s On The Easel March 2020, Vol. II, No. 3

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 

Well, to be honest…

There is nothing on the easel at this time. But that’s not to say I haven’t been busy.

 

Forty Eight Views of Brownstone Brooklyn to be exhibited …

This project was started ten years ago, moving along to completion in 2019. The flier says it all (yup no date for the artist’s reception for obvious reasons, I will send out a notice when a date is set). I hope many of you can find the time to stop by the gallery (and if you plan to do so, let me know, I'll meet you there and give a tour).

Untitled-1.jpg


A week in London, just before the madness set in …

After a great week in London, 7 museums, five fine restaurants and three pubs, we returned on the 2nd of March just missing the onset of the plague on the island. Here are some highlights of our trip worth noting:

 

The count stands at 17…

That is, with the addition of the two Vermeer's we encountered at the National Gallery, my worldwide count for viewing Vermeer's is now 17. There are two more in London we could not get to. Another trip (and I’m still pissed at the Lourve for closing the gallery when I visited some years ago).

P1000415.JPG

Steph is on the left and, for the life of me, I can't understand why the guy with the serious camera on the right is taking a photo. Hey, guy, go to the gift shop and buy a superior print.

Sometimes…

Sometimes you encounter a piece of art so stunning that, as I did here, you get choked up and giddy at the same time. Words and photographs cannot describe the impact of this Rembrandt piece in the National Galleries. It literally emanates light and the robe on the central figure sparkles and glows in it. 

P1000430.JPG

How the hell did he do that??? We went back the day before we left for home to see it again. I am still stunned.

 

Lisa C., look what we found in the Victoria and Albert Museum…

 

P1000445.JPG

Not exactly a ‘no art production’ month…

I did have this small commission, a charcoal sketch of his granddaughter for a friend .

P1000450.JPG

A Manifesto of Sorts … Why I do this, part 2.

 

Fortune (a 1 for me on a scale of 1, ‘not important’, to 10, ‘very important’)

 

Selling works is, I suppose, one measure of fame. But, in my observation, the marketplace is glutted with over priced mediocre work. (For example, at a recent art fair, 14c here in Jersey City, one of the exhibitors was a guy who salvaged strips of shredded paper and glued them, one line after the other with no rhyme or reason, onto large canvasses. More therapy than art and I can’t believe the so called ‘curators’ of the event even gave this guy the time of day). It’s hard enough to get through this clutter (fame) let alone get an uneducated, small screen focused public to shell out for it. But, more to the point, I don’t need the money. This situation allows me the privilege, as with not pursuing fame, to do as I please. It also affords me the opportunity to give away my work which, in turn, lays down the foundation for next month’s segment; legacy.

 

That’s all for now.

 

Everyone be well.

 

Jim

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’

To subscribe to this monthly email, drop me a note at theartistjimfischer@yahoo.com


Added Feb 21, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What's on the Easel, February 2020

What’s On The Easel, February 2020, Vol. II, No. 2

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

 Finished…

This month’s newsletter was delayed as I wanted to finish and deliver this portrait:

 ilene-3.jpg

The Process …

The finished piece rarely shows the process so here’s some pics; the untrimmed board with my test strokes in the margins, the palette at the peak of painting the background and the two key photographs used.

 5e5049c4a0578_untitled-1.jpg

untitled-2.jpg

Collateral products …

In keeping with past work, I continue to use the left over materials to create small pieces. And now I have come up with a new art form to describe these works: Serendipidous Reality. You see, the works are not intentionally planned, they are left over paint on the pallet smeared on a scrap of paper, scraped up paint from the pallet dropped on a mat board scrap and cuttings from the rags used to wipe the brushes. Using a cut mat template, I look for images, then I match the image to a quote. The quote serves the purpose of pulling the image to reality thus a collection of paint becomes a moth flying to a flower, Joseph dreaming about an angel, a grizzly bear fishing for salmon, and so on (you can see the full title quotes at my website, www.theartistjimfischer.com). Serendipidous Realism.

These are some of the results from the creation of the portrait:

serendipitous.jpg

A Manifesto of Sorts … Why do I do this?

An artist friend of mine, recently rejected from an exhibition, expressed to me her frustration with moving her art agenda forward and got me thinking, why do I do this? Nobody is buying and there are way too many competitors (with much mediocrity). So, I decided to do an exercise of self examination to reinforce my determination to forge on. There are six sections which I will publish in the newsletters one at a time starting with…

 Fame (6)

 Yeah, I guess anyone who makes an effort at something would like public recognition but I’ve come to the conclusion that (with rare exception) you can’t force it. If you are good enough fame will find you . So, I have decided to just do what I want to do, take it or leave it, and if fame should find me, so be it. But, I am not going to let the pursuit of fame detract from my enjoyment of what I am doing.

 (The number after the section title is the amount of importance it is to me, 10 being highest).

 That’s all for now.

 Everyone be well.

 

Jim


Added Feb 21, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What's on the Easel, January 2020

What’s On The Easel, January 2020, Vol. II, No. 1

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

Happy New Year!

And, what’s on the easel? To tell the truth, nothing new. Demands of the holidays have pretty much shut down the studio. But we are keeping busy.

Io sells…

Yup, my portrait of Io at the Monmouth County Museum has sold, at the opening no less. Not a lot of money but, hey, at least I got something else to show the IRS. 

 5e5048942ea3b_io-aye-0-1-oil-on-canvas-16x20-2019-150.jpg

And the Monmouth County Museum has already accepted two other pieces for their next show, Hiroshima and No Man’s Land.

5e50493fbb9f0_untitled-1.jpg

I seem to have found a venue that likes my work. They appear to be a rare venue that appreciates and is inclusive of realist art (which probably means they understand what the public likes and will buy). This is the fourth exhibit I will be in two years and after only seven tries, 4 for 7, batting 570 here.

Win Some, Loose Some

 img-20191206-180504104.jpg

Can you find my works in this gallery? 

Not only are many of the works here just a pot of paint thrown at a canvass, the curators obviously felt they should be thrown up on the wall en-mass as well. To make matters worse, the venue is a bar/restaurant where people appear to be more interested in eating and drinking than viewing art. To me that’s not very conducive to selling the works. More like they’re just decorating their walls for free. Oh, well, win some, loose some.

Five Days of Chaos

 p1000329.jpg

No, I’m not talking about the White House (that’s perpetual chaos). I’m talking about our house where we have now replaced all 22 1960s error vinyl windows with new ‘period’ wooden sashes. 

After much noise and wind we no longer have the wind rattling the frames, a draft wafting into each room and the street sounds imposing on us. The quiet was what we first noticed. Thank you Pella (the installers did a great job, after five days of bedlam you would never know they were here), 

And again, Happy New Year to you all.

Everyone be well.

Jim


Added Feb 21, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What's on the Easel, December 2019

What’s On The Easel, December 2019, Vol. I, No. 9

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

So, it starts…

… the winter, that is. The garden is packed up, the first snow is falling. Many people regard my profession, artist, as a glamorous occupation. The truth is it’s boring and lonely as well. And the winter is the worst. By about mid-February cabin fever will set in. I fully understand why, after a full day in the studio, artists traditionally gathered at the local watering hole. One evening, yes, at a local watering hole, I was having drinks with an artist friend. The woman to our right, overhearing our conversation, broke in saying, “I would love to come and watch you work someday.” My friend turned to her and responded, “You would be bored in 15 minutes.” Such is the life of an artist.

p1000318.jpg

 

What’s on the easel?

The portrait of Steph and Natalie, now finished, is installed in the dining room

p1000317.jpg

Setting personal goals and disciplining one’s self to sticking with them is another plight of the artist. I have set a goal this year of one portrait a month and, so, another portrait has been started. 

 p1000319.jpg

Show season

‘Tis the season for the local galleries to make some money selling gifts of art. So, I am currently showing in three venues (from the left) Io is in the Monmouth County Museum Holiday Show, Petopia, Two Geisha’s and two other small works are in a downtown Jersey City gallery and “The Perfect Hamburger” is in a ProArts show in Jersey City Hall’s rotunda gallery. Let’s see if any works sell.

 5e50474aa421b_untitled-1.jpg

 

What would you do… 

The other day I received an email from a ProArts member sent out to all members, including myself asking us to act on his behalf. A show that he was in was doing an online kind of ‘people’s choice’ contest. The voting site included images of each piece in the show but no artist names. This member was soliciting votes for his work from me and other ProArts members just on the basis of his ProArts affiliation. It was obvious that the gallery wanted a more esthetic decision based on just the art. What would you do?

In Other News…

This month’s newsletter is late due to the holidays (hey, isn’t everything delayed around this time). We spent a nice Thanksgiving with Natalie, her boyfriend, Jake, and his mother at his 1820s built house in Bergen just outside of Rochester. We had a comfortable train ride both ways (seats that recline almost flat) with no delays.

img-9835-momentn.jpg

Our annual Holiday Card (upper right in photo) is on the way.

p1000315.jpg

That’s all for now. Drop me a note if you like. I’d love to hear from you.

 Everyone be well.

 Jim


Added Feb 21, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What on the Easel, November 2019

What’s On The Easel, November 2019, Vol. I, No. 8

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

In the words of a famous man…

… It is finished! This is the largest and most ambitious portrait I have done to date. Yes, Steph and Natalie are standing on the edge of a cliff overlooking the Big Sur. But don’t be fooled, they were placed there by me (and the famous bridge, while nearby, is not that close to the ocean). Artist’s license.

p1000245.jpg

And from big things come little surprises … 

The large portrait has also generated twelve (and counting) smaller paintings. There are three methods I am using to ‘paint’ these works. The first, as demonstrated by the top row, involves creatively cutting up the wiping rags used during painting (they are, from left to right, Prometheus, Vesuvius and Icarus).

p1000263.jpg

The second method, shown with the three works center right) involves arranging the dried paint scrapings from cleaning the pallete (they are, from the left, Gheishas, Samurai and Shinto Priest). The third method, the bottom row, makes use of the remaining wet paint on the palette (I always seem to squeeze more than is actually needed) as scraped up and laid down on board with a palette knife (they are, from left to right, Moby Dick, Hiroshima I and Hiroshima II). Waste not, want not, eh.

Fifteen minutes of fame…

… For Io. His portrait sunning himself (and showing no pride) has been accepted into the holiday exhibit, Petopia, of the Monmouth County Museum. Go Io!

 p1000252.jpg

In Other News…

What to do with all those small pieces of glass left over when a leaded glass project is done? Well, I figured out how to cut them into 3/8 inch square pieces which had been, up to now, sitting in containers waiting. For many (about 1,000 pieces) the waiting is over. With the completion of the rebuilding of the front stairs we had the porch skimmed with concrete. Sooooooo, I had the contractor leave a 14 inch circle about 1/8 inch deep in the center that I filled with this:

 p1000260.jpg


AVAILABLE NOW! With the helpful advice by my friend, Jan Lorenc, I was able to create a catalog of the Whistler’s Venice Pastel exhibit. The full pdf of the book is too large for this newsletter (60mb) but if you are interested, and your inbox can handle the size, I’d gladly send it to you. Now, if you are interested in the hardcover publication (with dust jacket) I can get you one for $65. Just let me know.

whistlersvenicepastels-00.jpg

That’s all for now. Drop me a note if you like. I’d love to hear from you.

 

Everyone be well.

 

Jim


Added Feb 20, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What's on the Easel, October 2019

What’s On The Easel, October 2019, Vol. I, No. 7

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

About that procrastination …

…Well, I guess it’s feast or famine, and now I’m feasting.

On the easel is the reason I was procrastinating, a full size portrait of Steph and Natalie. Putting brush to canvas as a realist painter is always fraught with risk. After all, it does have to look like something other than a pot of paint flung at a canvas (yeah, don’t get me started). So, I sit on these pieces until one day my self confidence returns and I get to it. My worst critic (second only to myself), Stephanie, thus far approves (and since it is a portrait featuring her, that’s no easily made approval, whew).

p1000220.jpg 

Even Io gets into the act. I know, I did say in a previous newsletter that I would stop paying to get into an exhibit, and I just did it. But I couldn’t resist this one, a rare call for realist work featuring pets. The Monmouth County museum sent out the call for their holiday show and, since I’m batting .500 with them (2 out of four entries submitted for previous shows accepted), I kicked in the $20 bucks and submitted this ...

io.jpg 

I think it’s a pretty good likeness, Io is not amused. We’ll see if it is accepted, stay tuned.

Still Recycling Used Rags

The portrait on the easel has already generated a number of ancillary works from the clean up rages used thus far. They are only 5x7 and I’ve started a tradition of naming them with quotes that invoke the image I see.

 abstract.jpg

The one on the left is titled “O for a horse with wings - William Shakespeare”. The one on the right is a bit longer, “If you lose touch with nature you lose touch with humanity. If there’s no relationship with nature then you become a killer; then you kill baby seals, whales, dolphins, and man. Then nature is frightened of you, withdrawing its beauty. - Jiddi Krishnamurti” Only asking $20 each. Interested?

I’m Open For Business With JCAST

Every year at this time Jersey City organizes JCAST, Jersey City Arts & Studios Tour. It’s a big event with hundreds of artists and dozens of venues. As I have done for the past two years, my studio will be open to the public. ALL ARE INVITED!

jcast.jpg

In other News…

The cherry trees in the garden are gone, replaced by two Japanese lantern sculptures. They got a blight and the only solution offered by the experts was to remove them and not replace them. The disease is in the soil and can’t be eradicated. I enjoyed the intimacy they gave to the gazebo and, as such, will miss them. 

trees.jpg


So, I continue to be an avid commentator on the NYTs website and this month I broke my previous record for ‘recommend’s. Commenting on the Iran/Houti raid on the Saudis, I got 1,672 ‘recommends, which put me in the number two spot and it was also made a NYTs selection. I think the NYTs reviewers have flagged me as a good commentator, many of my comments are now posted immediately, within seconds of my hitting ‘submit.’ Cool! 

The resident squirrel (commonly referred to as ‘rats with bushy tails’) has discovered my tomatoes in the back garden. I caught him on the wall the other day chomping away at one and now I’m racing him to pick the ripe ones before he gets at them. Ah, the challenges of the urban garden. 

That’s all for now. Drop me a note if you like. I’d love to hear from you.

Everyone be well.

JIm


Added Feb 20, 2020
Permalink | Comments

What's on the Easel, September 2019

What’s On The Easel, September 2019, Vol. I, No. 6

A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

Procrastination (again)…

…Or, at least that’s what I thought when I started this edition. But, compiling a list of topics indicates otherwise (although not all art).

On the easel is the third of the series of ten paintings of Savannah, Georgia and, in a last minute situation, I received a call for art from the Monmouth County Museum’s holiday exhibit, “Pets.” So I decided to do an oil painting of Io in a somewhat compromising pose to submit for consideration.

 p1000181.jpg

io-aye-0-1-oil-on-canvas-16x20-2019-150.jpg

The two Savannah paintings that I finished this month have been scanned for prints (not that I have a clue what I will be doing with them).   

p1000183.jpg

A Friend Stops By 

So, I bought this high end printer a few months ago. Recently I invited my friend Lisa to come buy and scan some of her work. It was a good test run on making the equipment available to others. She was thrilled with the results. 

marshmellow001final.jpg

Of course we then had dinner in the garden which is at it’s peak. 

img-20190827-104447-338.jpg 

Our Own Little Woodstock, A Road Trip and An Annual Pilgrimage

I don’t know how you might feel but I found the media coverage of the 50th anniversary of Woodstock a bit over the top. I was reminded of a skit in a 1960s play, The Mad Show, where reporters are following a candidate at an event even into the men’s room where the last reporter announces, “And this is your reporter, John Doe, in the bowl”. Of course this is all sour grapes as I wasn’t there (my sleeping bag was and that’s another story). But my brother Rick was there and the NYTimes re-published a famous photo of the crowd with him right in the front. This time I was able to download it from their website and print a large 30” version for Rick to frame (this is a cropped version). 

rick-woodstock.jpg

(A trick should you download any photos from the NYTimes site: The dpi will come up in photoshop as 92, not good for prints, but if you change the dpi to 300 it will hold up and be greatly improved).

Rick and I also took a road trip to visit the Martin Guitar factory. They have a very impressive operation. The tour of the factory is thorough and both it and the museum are interesting (I didn’t know Gene Audry played a Martin). They impressed us with numbers that I actually found problematic. The factory produces 200 instruments a day, about 40,000 a year, with each selling for $3,500. It was definitely a factory operation, not custom in any way and that bothered me (although one section specialized in custom decoration, for a price, of course).

 photo3.jpg

And, finally, we did our annual trip to visit the family in Iowa where the big event was the return of our niece, Cody, from two years with the Peace Corp in Africa. There, but for fortune, would go you or I. A very brave young lady. This is a picture of Slater, the town where Steph was raised. I believe it’s population hovers somewhere around 1,000.  

pict0019.jpg 

That’s all for now.  

Everyone be well.

Jim


Added Aug 17, 2019
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel August 2019, Vol. I, No. 5

Procrastination…

I don’t know about other artists but I am subject to regular bouts of procrastination, I will go for a couple of months doing no art (and roaming around the house looking for anything but art to do). Then, one day I snap out of it and get going again. Well, after kicking around for the past three months, I am back at it. My art studio is divided into four areas: An easel for oil painting, a drawing/light board for colored pencil, another board for watercolor and a printer/scanner station. All four are back in action…

On the easel is a large portrait of Stephanie and Natalie (on the edge of a cliff overlooking Big Sur. 

On the drawing/light board is the first of eight citiscapes of Savannah, Georgia.

On the watercolor station are three small paintings of judges at an Irish festival upstate New York.

And the printer has been putting out complete box sets, of Whistler’s Venice and Forty-eight Views of Brownstone Brooklyn.

A Plethora of Art Calls… 

…no less than four this month and three of them had no entry fee (yes!). For the Monmouth County Museum I entered Niagara Falls in Winter: American Falls, a large montage photo (5 feet long), for Village West (a gallery in downtown Jersey City) I entered the box set of Forty-eight Views of Brownstone Brooklyn, for ProArts’ gallery during JCAST (Jersey City’s open studios weekend, October 3 - 6) I entered 4th of July/George Washington Bridge and for ProArts’ cookbook project I entered a recipe for “the perfect hamburger” accompanied by appropriate art(?), The Perfect Hamburger. So, any bets on which pieces get accepted?

 

In Other News…

So, my knee is slowly getting better. On the upside, I did get to gather up a nice collection of canes. The smaller red one is made of bloodroot wood from Africa, the light oak one is from London (nicely done with an ergonomic handle with a substantial hook to it for hanging) and a handcrafted cane from Turkey.


That’s all for now. Drop me a note if you like. I’d love to hear from you.

 

Everyone be well.

 

Jim


Added Jun 29, 2019
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel, July 2019, Vol. I, No. 4, A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

What’s On The Easel, July 2019, Vol. I, No. 4, A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

There’s more to art…

 …than paint on canvas and this past month for me has seen little time in the studio. I have been focused on finishing the design of the back garden and in the words of a famous man, “It is finished.”

 


This is the fourth formal garden I have design and developed. The raised beds have 15 different herbs, a very nicely grown garlic patch, five varieties of peppers, tomatoes (of course) and four different lettuces. We are calling it the Buddha Garden. And, of course, Cafe Fischer is open for visitors. 

House renovations as wel

Another agenda keeping me from the studio has been a number of major projects around the house that included painting several rooms (not by me, I’m out of that business this late in life but I did do the gold decorations ala Whistler’s Peacock Room in the dining room):

 

Also, work was done re-pointing the brick work on the entire outside of the house (again, contractors, you ain’t gettin’ me up those 30 foot ladders), replacing the deck in the back garden (almost broke my neck on the old one when one of the feet of the chair I was on fell through), a new, chef quality stove and various furnishing projects the most interesting of which was making a replica of a Frank Lloyd Wright lamp for the living room (got the plans online):

 

 

And, the Whistler’s Venice pastels have found a new home in our guest room…

  

Most every day I take some time in the late afternoon to listen to some music in this room. The pastels make for a very pleasant background. You are welcome to come visit us and see for yourself.

 A New Website Host

 This month I also completed the transfer of my website to a new, much improved carrier, Art Majeur. They are, obviously, out of France and, after exploring numerous sites for artists to archive and display their work, they have what I regard as the best set up. My website address remains www.theartistjimfischer.com. Take a look (and, if you are an artist, consider their services, I believe you will be impressed).

 In Other News…

To make all of the above work more difficult, I blew out my right knee as a result of the foot injury I suffered earlier in the year and have been hobbling around first on crutches and now with a cane. It’s getting better each day, the pain (and, ouch, this was painful) has subsided and I am able to climb the stairs again (when this happened Steph dubbed it The Steinbok Curse, Alan will understand). I did get to buy some neat canes (waiting on one from Turkey). 

I am an avid reader of The New York Times online. I read during my morning coffee and at lunch. I also comment on a regular basis (and I know many of you are not surprised). Well, it appears I have been flagged by the Times comment moderators as my comments are now being immediately approved and I reached a milestone with a recent post. I made a comment on an article on Ernie Pyle and D-Day celebrations. It became the #1 reader’s pick with 517 likes and a Times selection. Here’s what I wrote:

“My father never talked about his service in the war until one day, knowing he had been at D-day and having just seen 'Saving Private Ryan' I cornered him. It was during a holiday visit late at night, everyone else had gone to bed. "So," I said way to flippantly, "Was it really that bad." For the next hour I found out it was. My father drove a landing craft of Rangers in the lead part of the first wave. He watched the twenty odd men in his craft be slaughtered as they hit the water, saving his own life by hunkering down behind a thick steel plate, trying to obey his orders to "Bring this boat back at all costs". He did this three times in the first six hours of the invasion. Each time returning with a boat full of blood and body parts that he cleaned out by opening the gate on the return and letting the sea to the job. We believe now he suffered from PTSD for the rest of his life. He drank too much and would often be found sitting in the kitchen late at night, in the dark with only the light of a cigarette. I told his story a few years ago to a group of friends, some the children of survivors of the Holocaust. When I finished a friend (Alan) told me, "Thank you. I never met anyone who's father actually fought in such an important action in WWII." My father's story is a sadness that comes over me from time to time. We did not get along (Vietnam, and all that). Now I better understand.”

That’s all for now. Drop me a note if you like. I’d love to hear from you.

 Everyone be well.

 

Jim

 

Jim Fischer, 530 Liberty Avenue, Jersey City, NJ, 07307

To unsubscribe to this enewsletter, simple return this email with the subject line ‘unsubscribe.’


Added May 30, 2019
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel, June 2019, Vol. I, No. 3, A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

It’s a scam…

So, Jersey City recently had it’s first major gallery/artist show called 14C in the Hilton downtown  (Why 14C? Got me) and a ‘call for artists’ was sent out for a general exhibition in the hotel’s ballroom. After paying $40 and submitting three works some weeks later I received an email proudly announcing, “We received over 200 submissions” and declaring that 29 pieces had been accepted for the ballroom exhibition. So, do the math. They made $8,000 out of the box from mostly losers. On top of that, they would get a 40% commission for any sales (not that anything that made the cut was worth buying). 

And then there was the ‘call for art’ I got from a curator putting together a show in a small gallery in some town in North Jersey. The call was for small pieces (10 x10 inch max) and, wow, there was no entry fee. Ah, but there was a ‘hanging fee’ of $25 for accepted pieces and a 40% commission for the curator on sales. So, I estimate this ‘curator’ could squeeze in 200 pieces into the space, $5,000 in ‘hanging fees.” A nice haul for putting nails in walls.

So, there’s money to be made from them-thar desperate artists and now I, for one, am taking the advice of a reputable gallery owner and never again paying a fee to get into an exhibition. It’s a scam. 

The wrong work

 

Here we go again. While my serious realist works continue to be ignored, this piece, a rainy afternoon's amusement, another joke now gathering dust in the gallery (needs a cleaning) is selected and featured in an upcoming exhibit. I give up! I am not a sculptor! It's what I call 'junk art.’

 

 

 

The title I used for the entry is 'Dancing With Matisse', but it's real name is 'The Creation: Heaven and Earth' and it's part of a series of pieces based on the creation story in Genesis that also includes 'The Creation: Eve,' ‘The Creation: Light,’ ‘The Creation: Adam’ (in the works) and ‘The Creation: Day and Night/Flora and Fauna (in the works as well). They want garbage, I can do that:

 


So, was there anything on the easel?

 

Not really. This is the time of the year when I need to be outside working on the gardens (pictures to come in future newsletters).

 

In other news…

 

They call it a ‘bucket list’ and some people just want to see Paris, others want to climb up to Machu Picchu. Now, I don’t like to call it a ‘bucket list’ but I did have one thing I always wanted to do. Since the 1970s I have been a Wagnerian, one of those who enjoys the works of Richard Wagner, and for us kind of people nothing can top seeing a live performance of his Ring Cycle, The Rings of the Neubeling. And I did just that this month at the Metropolitan Opera. Four operas, 20+ hours over six days. Stunning, just stunning (although there were spots where you felt, ‘Come on, Wagner, move it along’). Alan, you haven’t heard The Ride of The Valkyries until you see the live performance, ten minutes that leave you in awe. Would I do it again? Actually, no. It was great but it was gruelling, so, once is enough.

 


That’s all for now. Drop me a note if you like. I’d love to hear from you.

 Everyone be well.

 Jim

 


Added May 30, 2019
Permalink | Comments

What’s On The Easel, May 2019, Vol. I, No. 2, A monthly newsletter from Jim Fischer

A note from Jim: A month has passed since my first newsletter. I started the month wondering if I would have anything to put into the next one and I started keeping a list. I stopped when it reached eight items in just one week. But this is a newsletter, not a book and, as such, I will limit my self to two or three items so as not to bore you, my reader.

So, what is on the easel? 

This is the story of a painting that goes to the heart of what art is, and isn’t, today (a favorite topic when I get together with fellow artists). When I do a painting I usually put much more paint on the palette than I will need. At the end of a session, when I no longer need those colors, I usually scrape them off and throw the pile of gook away. A couple weeks ago I decided to have some fun with the mess. I took a piece of scrap photo paper and, with a palette knife, randomly scraped the paints across the surface. The result was a small (8 x 10 inches) piece of something.  

 

 

 

But, what? I decided it looked like a WWI battle field and I called it ‘No Man’s Land’ It’s official title is a quote from a soldier’s letter home: “No-man’s land under snow is like the face of the moon: Chaotic, crater ridden, uninhabitable, awful, the abode of madness.” This seemed to give the work, a random mess, some context. You do see the snow, right?

Now I belong to an artist’s site where I post my work, Art Mejeur (artmejeur.com) and I put this one up. Low and behold, the editors of the site chose the piece as one of their weekly picks putting it on the home page. Most of my works rack up a couple hundred views and it takes at least 3 months for that. This piece, with it’s special placement, racked up 23,000 views in just two weeks! What do you know, a complete goof is being hailed as a masterpiece. Still, no one has stepped up to buy it. That’s what selling art today is like, a lot of lookers, no takers.

 A Tale of Two Townhouses

 With the closing of my Whistler exhibit (for which I suspended everything else in my life for five months) I have finally been able to get around to many things needing attention around the house (no art, after 60 pastels in 4 months I’m painted out for now). One of those ‘things’ was getting contractors to do some much needed painting. In keeping with our restoration of the place to 1910 condition, I had them paint the cornices in front deep, forest green. We are very happy with the results. Our efforts must have spurred a neighbor with an identical townhouse to do some painting as well. The results are, well, somewhat different than our efforts. All I can say is to let the pictures speak for themselves (oh, but what a travesty to paint over the beautiful yellow-with-iron-flecks original brick). Whatever.

 

 

 

In other news…

 I opened a YouTube account where you can view:

 Whistler’s Venice gallery: https://youtu.be/ZvHyNrhjejU

How I did a pastel reproduction: https://youtu.be/h_DaN9r9ZhQ

And a surprise original composition: https://youtu.be/-pl3Ru9qmn4 

April is the month I work in the gardens getting ready for summer. Yaaaaaay, summer! 

 

That’s all for now. Drop me a note if you like. I’d love to hear from you.

 Everyone be well.

Recent activity


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Bent !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Chivalry (see full title in description)
(Painting, 6.8x4.8x0.3 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Racing Yachts
(Painting, 4.5x6.5x0.3 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

"2020 Man-of-the-Year", The Grim Reaper
(Painting, 5x3x1 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Cerebus
(Painting, 10x7x1 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Akurazuko (Evil Spirit)
(Painting, 9x7x1 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

"Un bel di, vedremo" Madama Butterfly, G. Puccini
(Painting, 4x3x1 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

"Vengence is their decree!" Hagen, Gotterdammerung, R.Wagner
(Painting, 4x6x1 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Tango
(Painting, 6x4x1 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Renaud Angerville-Langlois !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Irina Borisova !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Ana Gonçalves !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Cdenis 4 !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Irina Sumanenkova !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by James Shang !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Die Fledermaus
(Painting, 1.3x3.2 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Blue Bird
(Painting, 4.5x4.5 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Guena !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Iana Rebus !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Butterflies (see full title in description)
(Painting, 8x6 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by G O R F I !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Cody
(Painting, 10x8 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

"Life is a frail moth flying" II
(Painting, 2x3.4 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Ningyo (Fishman)
(Painting, 5.5x8 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Nadine Bourneix !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Sunday Afternoon at the Beach: Flags
(Painting, 36x48 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Icebergs! (see full title under description)
(Painting, 5x7 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Witte Wieven
(Painting, 6.5x4.5 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

The Light Brigade (see full title under description)
(Painting, 5x7 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Attack Ships on Fire (see full title under description)
(Painting, 5x7 in)


Jmsbell Portrait Jmsbell Follow has posted a new comment
11x7 in ©2019 by Jim Fischer
The Old Marble Palace - Painting, 11x7 in ©2019 by Jim Fischer - Impressionism, impressionism-603, artwork_cat.Cityscape, Venice, Whistler, pastel

Splendid Art! luv~


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Jmsbell !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has uploaded a new piece of art

Yokai Yamauba (Demon Witch of the Mountain)
(Painting, 7x5 in)


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Iconbys !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Ghislaine Chomienne !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Sara Silva !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by A. Dall'Agnolo !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Cinzia Barresi !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Tchago Martins !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Sgs !

Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow is now followed by Stéphane Proulx !

Gilles Tranier Portrait Gilles Tranier Follow has posted a new comment
10x8 in ©2019 by Jim Fischer
Samurai - Collages, 10x8 in ©2019 by Jim Fischer - Abstract, abstract-570, People, Japan, warrior

Envoutant !


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has posted a new comment
©2017 by Jim Fischer
George Washington Bridge/4th of July - Photography ©2017 by Jim Fischer - artwork_cat.Cityscape, Washington, bridge, 4th of july

Thank you.


Jacques Jégo Portrait Jacques Jégo Follow has posted a new comment
©2017 by Jim Fischer
George Washington Bridge/4th of July - Photography ©2017 by Jim Fischer - artwork_cat.Cityscape, Washington, bridge, 4th of july

Superbe point de vue pour ce pont au drapeau !.


Saho Portrait Saho Follow has posted a new comment
18x9 in ©2018 by Jim Fischer
Galileo - Painting, 18x9 in ©2018 by Jim Fischer - Figurative, figurative-594, Animals, pastel, animals, cat

so beauty ..!


Saho Portrait Saho Follow has posted a new comment
7x10 in © by Jim Fischer
Reproduction of Whistler's "Salute Sundown" - Painting, 7x10 in ©2019 by Jim Fischer - Impressionism, impressionism-603, artwork_cat.Cityscape, Venice

Beautiful ..!


Dodi Ballada Portrait Dodi Ballada Follow has posted a new comment
10x7 in ©2018 by Jim Fischer
Reproduction Whistler "Campanile Santa Margharita" - Painting, 10x7 in ©2018 by Jim Fischer - artwork_cat.Cityscape, Venice, Whistler, Reproduction

Je suis fan!


Michèle Lemarechal Portrait Michèle Lemarechal Follow has posted a new comment
14x9 in ©2010 by Jim Fischer
Boat Pond, Prospect Park, Brooklyn - Painting, 14x9 in ©2010 by Jim Fischer - Figurative, figurative-594, artwork_cat.Cityscape, Brooklyn

Magnifique oeuvre


Jim Fischer Portrait Jim Fischer Follow has posted a new comment
10x7 in ©2014 by Jim Fischer
beach-8a.jpg - Painting, 10x7 in ©2014 by Jim Fischer - Figurative, figurative-594, Beach, watercolor, beach, bathing suit, sunny

Oui!


Alain Grisel Portrait Alain Grisel Follow has posted a new comment
10x7 in ©2014 by Jim Fischer
beach-8a.jpg - Painting, 10x7 in ©2014 by Jim Fischer - Figurative, figurative-594, Beach, watercolor, beach, bathing suit, sunny

Ça sent l'été et les vacances .