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Glasper Jerrie

Jerrie Glasper
(1963- )
Nationality: us United States


10 artworks   Artistic domains : Painting

Past Clients:
Ducks Unlimited, Whitetails Unlimited, Mississippi Department of Wildlife Conservation, Governor Haley and Marsha Barbour (R Mississippi), Peabody Hotel, Jerry & Jackie Rice, Southern Breeze Gallery, Attic Gallery,

Jerrie Glasper is an accomplished African American artist in Jackson, Mississippi, but was born in the inner city of Chicago, Illinois. His father, Matthew James Glasper,Jr. (who died when Jerrie was only nine years old) was the first to imprint him with a love for drawing and painting as a form of self expression, when he was about five years old. "As far back as I can remember", says Jerrie, "I was encouraged to develop an appreciation of the arts". Oils or acrylic paints are what he uses to render paintings in the style of contemporary realism. He feels most comfortable painting the things that are indigenous to the rural south which has become a part of him. He has, lately, focused on painting Mississippi delta "blues artists" and the music culture that is rich with characters who are both whimsicial as well as philosophical in their approach to coping with the trials of life. "I love capturing the expressions of love, joy, and pain in the faces of blues singers," says Glasper. I also try to convey the power of faith and hope for a better tomorrow, which is a cornerstone of blues music. To date, Jerrie has designed three Mississippi Delta Blues and Heritage Festival posters. He has also created paintings for Whitetails Unlimited, Ducks Unlimited, the Mississippi Department of Wildlife Conservation's "duck stamp" program, the prestigious Leigh Yawkey Woodson Birds In Art show in Easton, Maryland, and has painted thirty wall murals inside the Jubilee Casino in Greenville, Mississippi
Past Clients:
Ducks Unlimited, Whitetails Unlimited, Mississippi Department of Wildlife Conservation, Governor Haley and Marsha Barbour (R Mississippi), Peabody Hotel, Jerry & Jackie Rice, Southern Breeze Gallery, Attic Gallery,

Jerrie Glasper is an accomplished African American artist in Jackson, Mississippi, but was born in the inner city of Chicago, Illinois. His father, Matthew James Glasper,Jr. (who died when Jerrie was only nine years old) was the first to imprint him with a love for drawing and painting as a form of self expression, when he was about five years old. "As far back as I can remember", says Jerrie, "I was encouraged to develop an appreciation of the arts". Oils or acrylic paints are what he uses to render paintings in the style of contemporary realism. He feels most comfortable painting the things that are indigenous to the rural south which has become a part of him. He has, lately, focused on painting Mississippi delta "blues artists" and the music culture that is rich with characters who are both whimsicial as well as philosophical in their approach to coping with the trials of life. "I love capturing the expressions of love, joy, and pain in the faces of blues singers," says Glasper. I also try to convey the power of faith and hope for a better tomorrow, which is a cornerstone of blues music. To date, Jerrie has designed three Mississippi Delta Blues and Heritage Festival posters. He has also created paintings for Whitetails Unlimited, Ducks Unlimited, the Mississippi Department of Wildlife Conservation's "duck stamp" program, the prestigious Leigh Yawkey Woodson Birds In Art show in Easton, Maryland, and has painted thirty wall murals inside the Jubilee Casino in Greenville, Mississippi


Articles:

The Art of Jerrie Glasper

The Art of Jerrie Glasper


Past Clients:
Ducks Unlimited, Whitetails Unlimited, Mississippi Department of Wildlife Conservation, Governor Haley and Marsha Barbour (R Mississippi), Peabody Hotel, Jerry & Jackie Rice, Southern Breeze Gallery, Attic Gallery,

Jerrie Glasper is an accomplished African American artist in Jackson, Mississippi, but was born in the inner city of Chicago, Illinois. His father, Matthew James Glasper,Jr. (who died when Jerrie was only nine years old) was the first to imprint him with a love for drawing and painting as a form of self expression, when he was about five years old. "As far back as I can remember", says Jerrie, "I was encouraged to develop an appreciation of the arts". Oils or acrylic paints are what he uses to render paintings in the style of contemporary realism. He feels most comfortable painting the things that are indigenous to the rural south which has become a part of him. He has, lately, focused on painting Mississippi delta "blues artists" and the music culture that is rich with characters who are both whimsicial as well as philosophical in their approach to coping with the trials of life. "I love capturing the expressions of love, joy, and pain in the faces of blues singers," says Glasper. I also try to convey the power of faith and hope for a better tomorrow, which is a cornerstone of blues music. To date, Jerrie has designed three Mississippi Delta Blues and Heritage Festival posters. He has also created paintings for Whitetails Unlimited, Ducks Unlimited, the Mississippi Department of Wildlife Conservation's "duck stamp" program, the prestigious Leigh Yawkey Woodson Birds In Art show in Easton, Maryland, and has painted thirty wall murals inside the Jubilee Casino in Greenville, Mississippi

Conversations Magazine Interview with Jerrie Glasper

Conversations Magazine Interview with Jerrie Glasper


Jerrie Glasper Interview
By CONVERSATIONS MAGAZINE
Last edited: Thursday, May 11, 2006
Posted: Monday, May 08, 2006



One of Mississippi's own reveals the passion of his work in this EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW. An excerpt will appear in the Clarion Ledger newspaper (the state of Mississippi's largest newspaper) on Thursday, May 25th. This is the only place you will get the whole story.

Jerrie, thanks for taking the time to talk with us. You are the first visual artist we have interviewed for Conversations. I want to go back to when you first realized your interest in the arts. Do you remember when that was, and has it been limited to visual art?
I've been interested in art as far back as I can remember. My father was my first art instructor because he introduced me to drawing at a very early age and he taught me to observe and be aware of my environment at all times. I remember going to see the Chicago Symphony Orchestra when I was a child and was imprinted at an early age with an appreciation for classical music. I often listen to classical music when I am painting because it calms me and heightens my awareness. I don't play an instrument but two of my favorites are alto saxophone and violin.

For some, being creative is as natural as any other daily activity. Does it come naturally for you, and what normally inspires you?
Yes. It is as natural as falling in love. If you study a thing long enough, I once read, it will reveal some of it's secrets to you. I've had a love affair with the visual art muse and she reveals herself quietly, yet, she's somewhat stingy because I am only beginning to learn how to paint. I frequently look at the art of the Hudson River School painters, and the Dutch masters because they humble me and inspire me, as well. I must say, though, that inspiration is elusive in that it can come from a song, or the dappled light that dances across a leaf or a stone, or a glimmer of light that dances and walks across the water. The very mysterious nature and uncertain origin of inspiration seems to mirror the most elusive of all creatures - God.

Today, Jerrie, the arts are not focused upon the way they were in years past, especially in public schools. Do you think that has anything to do with young people finding more destructive ways to express themselves?
I was fortunate to have had the profound pleasure of learning from two great art masters during high school. They were Mississipians Bob Tompkins and Leon Koury, respectively. The two men helped me through teaching me the academic method of art instruction. Art in schools can definitely help to harness and focus the raw energies of young people and show them a better way to express their creative passions.

I've had the pleasure to see some of your art in the past, and you are versatile in your subject matter. How important has that been to you finding a market for your work?
The market is fickle. Having acquired a degree of versatility is a definite plus because it has given me the confidence to paint fluently within more than one art genre.

Do you feel that being in Mississippi has been good for your career, and have you seen a shift as to who is normally attracted to your work?
It has been very difficult trying to become a successful artist in Mississippi. There are some prejudices and hard knocks that success minded artist must endure. It's all a part of paying your dues. If you come from a rural community, it may be best that you seek to sell your art in larger cites where there tends to be more culture, better race relations, and a larger number of educated people that will appreciate and can afford quality artwork. I think that the subject matter that I choose to paint has a bearing on the collectors that will ultimately show an interest in my Mississippi delta scenic landscape and cotton field paintings, as well as Mississippi delta blues paintings, wall murals, oil portraits, pet portraits, wildlife art and nature scenes.

All creatives have to be involved somewhat in the business side of their craft. Do you find it as enjoyable as the actual production of your work, or does it take away from the joy of creating for you?
Learning the business of art is very important, although, less enjoyable. It is an important commodity for those commercial minded artists that aim to become national or internationally viable as an artist. Time management will also help. I am still learning to manage my time effectively.
There does seem to be an influx in the arts in the city of Jackson (MS) over the past few years. Does this make it more difficult when it comes to marketing yourself? How do you help your work to stand out from others?
I am glad to hear that Jackson, Mississippi is experiencing a cultural awakening. As far as marketing my art goes, I don't do anything particularly to make my artwork stand out from the crowd. I simply do my very best and pray that the multitudes will see my artistic creations and purchase them avidly.

What has been your greatest professional achievement up to this point?
I would like to think that my greatest professional achievement was in finally learning to loosen up when I paint and to accept the aid and gifts of God and accept the wisdom and guidance of our ancestors.

Can you give us some insight how you handle the disappointments that come with the life of an artist?
I simply remember the bible story how that before Joseph's dream of becoming a ruler came to past, he was sold into slavery by his own brothers. He was guided by the Great I Am through dungeons of shame, humiliation and betrayal until the proper time and season for the fulfillment of that childhood dream. Ultimately, God did just what He said He would do. Imagine that! God was guiding Joseph even in the shadows, even when it seemed that everything was going wrong.

I know you just had a show at Southern Breeze Gallery. Can you tell us how your relationship with them began?
I walked into the gallery without an appointment (which is frowned upon by the industry)to show photos of my art and the gallery owner liked what she saw and felt that it would be profitable for the both of us to join together to market my art. She (Jackie Ellens) felt that my paintings could fill a particular niche.

I'm sure you will agree that art is open for interpretation. What do you hope people leave your work feeling or thinking?
At best, I hope that the right viewer will feel a strong emotional connection and that the image will linger as a good after taste.

Do you have any advice for aspiring artists that see your work or that of others and think they want to pursue a similar career?
For all aspiring artist, I strongly suggest that you develop a very thick skin because there is often lots of rejection and prejudices and self doubt and racism and tears and personal setbacks untold. It's all a part of paying your dues to the muse. However, if the need to create is in your heart and saturates your thoughts both day and night, then you, my captain, will achieve! --- that is, if you learn the business side of art with some fervor, too.

Thank you for your time, Jerrie, and your sincere answers. If our readers want to find out more about you, how can they do so?
By visiting southernbreeze.net and glasperart.net

About the Artist

About the Artist


errie’s father, Matthew James Glasper, Jr., was his first and most influential art instructor. He credits his father for helping to open his eyes to the subtle color variations found in nature and his mother for nurturing his confidence through steadfast encouragement. He credits God for granting him freedom of expression.

Jerrie paints with oils and Acrylics. The under-painting is rendered in this wash of acrylics and allowed to dry. Next, oil “glazes” are built up in layers to create color interest. “I seem to have the tendency to join the techniques of realism, abstraction and impressionism,” says Jerrie, “whether it be portraits, wildlife or landscapes.”

Mr. Glasper also paints wall murals and faux finishes.