Back to top

Art gallery

Rikka AyasakiRikka Ayasaki Follow

Back to profile Galleries
Ayasaki Rikka

Rikka Ayasaki
Nationality: jp Japan


31 artworks   Artistic domains : Painting

*From Tokyo to Paris- Insight into the Work of Rikka Ayasaki*

Ayasaki expresses a variety of emotions using red as her theme colour in a very distinctive movement. This style stems from the time where she initially painted in black and white and reflects the strong personality of a unique woman who loves the colour red. The halfway abstract landscapes are poetic with a striking use of colour . Ayasaki exhibited in the prominent French art salons, notably in the French National Galleries of the Grand Palais and the Louvre Museum. Her work is held in many private collections by medical centers, famous musicians in France, Japan, UK, USA and others.

A: Please explain more about your connection between appearance and reality and how this is expressed in your work?
Ayasaki: I used to be working as a radio and TV speaker, narrator and interviewer in Tokyo. I perfected my techniques of traditional ink wash painting under Master Shogaku Suzuki, before I moved to Paris in 1999 where I joined the Studios of fine Arts of the Paris City Hall. Under the guidance of main professor A. ROS BLASCO, I developed a very strong feeling for the western art culture that stimulated my creation. After being selected by historical art salons for my oil paintings, I concentrated on this technique. I am now fortunate to be exhibiting across the world.

A: You work with narratives from both history and contemporary events, what is behind your inspiration?
Ayasaki:The Boulogne Forest, Paris’s skyline or the never boring streets are good examples of inspiration. The landscapes and nature surrounding our daily lives inspire me. Even though they are both big cities, Tokyo and Paris have very different atmospheres and murmurs around the city. The hustle and bustle in various tones, very far from those of Japanese, appeal to my intuition. I need a long time to internalize those elements until I can start painting. Then I stand in front of the canvas with some music to take me into the world of fantasy.

A: You work across genres, expand on your technique and your approach.
Ayasaki: There is a fundamental difference between both techniques. Ink wash paintings request a minimalistic approach, where the painter subtracts all superfluous elements from the picture. They must appeal to the psychology of people and suggest colours with only black, white and nuances of grey. The painter only has one attempt to make it right. Oil paintings appeal to our five senses and attract the viewer almost immediately. It is possible to remake it by adding paint on top, which takes off the pressure even though strong concentration is required. The difficulty here is to know when to stop and not to ruin it.

A:Who or what influences you as an artist?
Ayasaki: Today I mainly paint with oil, but I started out with ink wash paintings so, from Monet and the Japonism to Klimt, there are all the artists who got influenced by the very traditional Japanese Ukio-e. I admire Turner who also inf... Read More
*From Tokyo to Paris- Insight into the Work of Rikka Ayasaki*

Ayasaki expresses a variety of emotions using red as her theme colour in a very distinctive movement. This style stems from the time where she initially painted in black and white and reflects the strong personality of a unique woman who loves the colour red. The halfway abstract landscapes are poetic with a striking use of colour . Ayasaki exhibited in the prominent French art salons, notably in the French National Galleries of the Grand Palais and the Louvre Museum. Her work is held in many private collections by medical centers, famous musicians in France, Japan, UK, USA and others.

A: Please explain more about your connection between appearance and reality and how this is expressed in your work?
Ayasaki: I used to be working as a radio and TV speaker, narrator and interviewer in Tokyo. I perfected my techniques of traditional ink wash painting under Master Shogaku Suzuki, before I moved to Paris in 1999 where I joined the Studios of fine Arts of the Paris City Hall. Under the guidance of main professor A. ROS BLASCO, I developed a very strong feeling for the western art culture that stimulated my creation. After being selected by historical art salons for my oil paintings, I concentrated on this technique. I am now fortunate to be exhibiting across the world.

A: You work with narratives from both history and contemporary events, what is behind your inspiration?
Ayasaki:The Boulogne Forest, Paris’s skyline or the never boring streets are good examples of inspiration. The landscapes and nature surrounding our daily lives inspire me. Even though they are both big cities, Tokyo and Paris have very different atmospheres and murmurs around the city. The hustle and bustle in various tones, very far from those of Japanese, appeal to my intuition. I need a long time to internalize those elements until I can start painting. Then I stand in front of the canvas with some music to take me into the world of fantasy.

A: You work across genres, expand on your technique and your approach.
Ayasaki: There is a fundamental difference between both techniques. Ink wash paintings request a minimalistic approach, where the painter subtracts all superfluous elements from the picture. They must appeal to the psychology of people and suggest colours with only black, white and nuances of grey. The painter only has one attempt to make it right. Oil paintings appeal to our five senses and attract the viewer almost immediately. It is possible to remake it by adding paint on top, which takes off the pressure even though strong concentration is required. The difficulty here is to know when to stop and not to ruin it.

A:Who or what influences you as an artist?
Ayasaki: Today I mainly paint with oil, but I started out with ink wash paintings so, from Monet and the Japonism to Klimt, there are all the artists who got influenced by the very traditional Japanese Ukio-e. I admire Turner who also influenced Monet: his beautiful skies, atmospheres, his strong and grand nature, his deep colours. And also Kandinsky, Feininger… all are great artists who allowed my conversion from just appreciating looking at the paintings to painting myself. I am very grateful to be in an environment that offers me the possibility of keeping looking at their original paintings.

A:Where do you see your work going in the future?
Ayasaki: For an artist, the most unfortunate is to not present its work. I wish many people see my original paintings and bind a connection with them. Particularly, getting live comments from visitors at an exhibition is very exciting. It is interesting that the reaction in front of a painting differs from one region to another. So I would like to keep exhibiting actively in various countries. For now, exhibitions are planned in France but also in Switzerland, Japan and Germany for 2015 and 2016. As for my creations, I would like to try out new expressions using mixed media. I hope to keep myself as an artist in a fresh and discovering feel.

*British art magazine”Aesthetica”


Articles:

Rikka Ayasaki, peintre de l'intuition

Rikka Ayasaki, peintre de l'intuition


Dans un article récent, intitulé « quelques tendances de l’art contemporain et leurs racines profondes », publié dans la seconde édition de "Pour un Art de l’intuition*" , j’évoque brièvement l’œuvre de Rikka Ayasaki en ces termes :

Rikka Ayasaki, en plus de tableaux géométriques inspirés des encres japonaises, du « sumi-é » sur toile, crée des tableaux incontestablement intuitifs se situant entre figuration et abstraction, où les couleurs flamboient dans une danse frénétique et virevoltante, créant leur propre matière et leurs propres formes.

Il aurait fallu préciser que trois tendances se dégagent dans l’œuvre de ce peintre, une série nommée « Passions » qui combine les couleurs de l’art occidental aux tons uniques des orientales, une série « Fenêtres » composée de peintures à l’encre sur toile, et une série « Noir et Blanc », peintures sur papiers Washi japonais. La série « Fenêtres » est inspirée de la technique du sumi-é japonais qui consiste à n’utiliser que l’encre noire. La performance du peintre est réelle car il ne peut pas corriger la toile ainsi obtenue, comme un tableau à l’huile par exemple. Le peintre doit se concentrer avant de peindre le tableau, se sentir en harmonie avec le nature et méditer profondément. Le sumi-é, que nous aurions tendance de prime abord à assimiler à de la peinture géométrique, est donc bien plus que cela. C’est de l’art spirituel. Kandinski, dans son essai "Du Spirituel dans l’Art et dans la peinture en particulier", a parfaitement analysé la dimension spirituelle de l’art, et notamment de l’action de la couleur.

Si dans la série « Noir et Blanc », peintures sur papiers Washi japonais, respectant encore une tradition orientale, Rikka Ayasaki n’utilise pas toutes les gammes de couleur comme c’est au contraire plutôt la tradition en occident, et notamment en Europe, elle le fait, et de façon ô combien magistrale dans sa série « Passions », à laquelle je faisais allusion tout à l’heure.

C’est que sa peinture y devient un carrefour entre les cultures. Ce transculturalisme donne une dimension extrêmement riche à sa palette, d’autant que celle-ci apparaît d’un maîtrise époustouflante. Il s’agit d’atteindre au céleste, par un effet de transparence. Ce n’est plus le poète mais le peintre qui se fait ici « voleur de feu », le feu de la fulgurance intuitive. Ce type de peinture exige selon moi une lecture du spectateur elle-même intuitive, car dans ce cas, on atteint bien « le deuxième résultat primordial de la contemplation de la couleur, qui provoque une vibration de l’âme », comme l’affirme Kandinski dans "Du Spirituel dans l’Art et dans la peinture en particulier**". L’intuition ne cherche pas à se traduire, mais "se manifeste" dans la toile de façon virtuose, tout partant de la sensation. La toile, obtenue de façon fulgurante, selon l’immédiateté du sentiment, bien qu’elle soit autre et plus actuelle, rappelle maîtrise et génie de peintres comme Turner ou le Monet des nymphéas. L’objet « intuitionné », aperçu dans sa fulgurante vérité, est si éblouissant qu’il ne saurait se manifester de façon nette mais dans un certain flou de l’intuition. Les couleurs, d’une beauté presque insoutenable, comme chez Chagall encore - si je ne veux parler que du génie exceptionnel du coloriste -, se fondent les unes dans les autres. Les lignes, les contours n’existent pas, la ligne d’horizon elle-même s’efface si bien que nous ne savons plus s’il s’agit d’abstraction ou de figuration, comme dans les toiles les plus déroutantes de Turner et de Monet, notamment, que je viens de citer. C’est qu’il s’agit ni de l’un ni de l’autre, mais de peinture née de l’intuition, ce que je nomme intuitionisme.Pour ces raisons, je tiens Rikka Ayasaki pour l’une des plus grandes peintres actuelles. On retrouve aussi dans sa façon de faire ce qui caractérise l’œuvre de certains poètes ou écrivains contemporains, comme Yves Bonnefoy ou Philippe Jaccottet, ou dans le domaine oriental le peintre et écrivain Gao Xingjian (Prix Nobel de littérature 2000, année on ne peut plus symbolique pour l’art nouveau), dont j’avais cité en son temps dans mon "Art de l’Intuition" l’essai Pour "une nouvelle Esthétique", qui préconisait un art de l’intuition s’éloignant du concept - comme le fait aussi Yves Bonnefoy -, traçant un pont entre l’Orient et l’Occident. Rikka Ayasaki se situe selon moi dans un espace semblable. Du premier coup d’oeil, quand j’ai découvert son œuvre dans une galerie parisienne, j’ai compris que j’avais affaire à l’une des plus grandes artistes intuitives de notre époque. Je pense que Gao Xingjian ne me contredirait pas, lui qui, quand il peint, et bien que son pays d’origine soit la Chine, utilise presque toujours l’encre et ne cesse de préconiser un art non conceptuel né des intuitions les plus profondes de l’artiste, art qui confine forcément au spirituel, comme nous l’enseigne si bien l’Asie.

(Le point de vue du poète intuitiste : Eric Sivry)
------------------------------
* Editions D’Ici et D’Ailleurs, Meaux, 2011. Première édition, Anagrammes / La Tilv, Perros-Guirec, Les Celtes suivis de Pour un Art de l’intuition, 2003.
**1954. Gallimard, folio essais, 1989, p. 107.

Rikka AYASAKI - Atelier

Rikka AYASAKI - Atelier

Salon d'Automne(Paris), Prix de Peinture 2012

Salon d'Automne(Paris), Prix de Peinture 2012


Lors du dernier Salon d'Automne qui s'est tenu en octobre à Paris, Rikka Ayasaki a reçu un “Prix de Peinture 2012”.


Certificat honoraire de la plus haute qualité (2012)

Certificat honoraire de la plus haute qualité (2012)


Rikka AYASAKI a reçu un "Certificat honoraire de la plus haute qualité" du jury de la VIIIème Biennale Internationale de Dessin Pilsen 2012.
Son oeuvre est exposée pendant 6 semaines au Musée de la Bohème occidentale, Tchéquie.


5 meilleures oeuvres 2007: au concours ArtSEEN Journal (Italie,UK.NY).

5 meilleures oeuvres 2007: au concours ArtSEEN Journal (Italie,UK.NY).


La pluie dans une grand ville 26

Primeée comme une des 5 meilleures oeuvres 2007 soumises au concours organiseé par ArtSEEN Journal (Italie,UK.NY).
Rikka Ayasaki est une artiste japonaise vivant a Paris, France. Elle pratique la
technique de l'encre sur papier SUMI-E depuis 17 ans, adaptant avec
succes l'ancienne technique japonaise au monde moderne.

Son dessin "Pluie dans une grande ville" capture l'atmosphere
monumentale d'un orage de pluie, le poids des nuages et, avec
vraisemblance, on peut sentir l'odeur du sol mouille.


la meilleure oeuvre non figurative 2007

la meilleure oeuvre non figurative 2007


INTERSTICES 208 : L'encre sur papier japonais "WASHI".
remporte le Prix de la meilleure oeuvre non figurative 2007
XXVème Salon du Val de Cher